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dc.creatorWilson, Myra
dc.creatorJohnson, Anne
dc.creatorBates, James
dc.creatorDougherty, Cynthia
dc.creatorBrod, Kathryn
dc.creatorLepicki, Traci
dc.creatorButler, Brian
dc.creatorDaniel, Kenneth
dc.creatorMettler, Brianna
dc.creatorEngelbach, Michele
dc.creatorUllom-Vucelich, Dana
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-20T15:00:21Z
dc.date.available2018-04-20T15:00:21Z
dc.date.issued2018-04
dc.identifier.citationEngaged Scholars, v. 6 (2018).en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/84720
dc.descriptionA perfect storm is brewing in the long-term care and senior living industry. This storm is comprised of a growing shortage of nurses and direct care workers, aging baby boomers, and a drastic reduction of potential family caregivers. These different segments have started to intersect and impact delivery of health care services and the recruitment and retention of direct care workers to long-term care. This will continue to have far-reaching implications and pose significant strain and challenges for the current health care model. Over the past three years, Alber Enterprise Center has addressed workforce issues in the long-term services and support (LTSS) organizations in Ohio. This presentation will describe how the center built strong connections with LeadingAge Ohio, Ohio State's Office of Geriatrics and Interprofessional Aging Studies, and Extension's Family and Consumer Sciences educators. We will discuss the process used to dig deeply into the concerns shared by CEOs and HR professionals across the industry, to prioritize the most pressing issues, and to ultimately create new training programs for LTSS workers. One of the deliverables from this collaboration – a training program for front-line direct care (non-clinical) workers – is creating a buzz in LTSS organizations. Dubbed the Elder Care Certificate (ECC) program, it blends existing online curriculum (Ohio State's College of Medicine Topics in Gerontology) with new non-credit curriculum (soft skills) designed specifically for workers in LTSS. The ultimate goal is to increase the workers' knowledge base about elder care and enhance their interactions with residents in senior living communities. Program evaluation of the pilot program in 2017 from both participants and employers revealed that it made a significant impact on the participants, the employers and the elders they serve. Follow-up discussions with LTSS leaders have been positive. They want this training. They stressed that to make a real impact throughout the LTSS industry and be accepted industry-wide as a desired credential for elder care workers, ECC must be delivered to as many Ohio LTSS workers as possible within a short time frame. This session will share the outcomes of the ECC program to excite Extension educators interested in the well-being of Ohio seniors and to invite them to become trainers of the program in their counties. This program has the opportunity to generate cost-recovery income.en_US
dc.descriptionAUTHOR AFFILIATION: Myra Wilson, Program Director, Alber Enterprise Center, wilson.2025@osu.edu (Corresponding Author); Anne Johnson, Senior Organization Development Consultant, Alber Enterprise Center; James Bates, The Ohio State University Extension Field Specialist, Family Wellness; Cynthia Dougherty, Director, Office of Geriatrics and Interprofessional Aging Studies, The Ohio State Univerisy College of Medicine; Kathryn Brod, CEO and President, Leadingage Ohio; Traci Lepicki, Associate Director, Center on Education and Training for Employment, Ohio State College of Education and Human Ecology; Brian Butler, The Ohio State University Extension Evaluation Specialist; Rev. Kenneth Daniel, CEO and President, United Church Homes; Brianna Mettler, Executive Director, Community Health Services, National Church Residences; Michele Engelbach, CEO and President, Ohio Eastern Star Home; Dana Ullom-Vucelich, Chief Human Resources and Ethics Officer, Ohio Living.en_US
dc.description.abstractA perfect storm is brewing in the long-term care and senior living industry with a growing shortage of nurses and direct care workers, aging baby boomers, and a drastic reduction of potential family caregivers. These different segments have started to intersect, and they will impact delivery of health care services, as well as recruitment and retention of direct care workers to long-term care. A collaboration has formed among Ohio State depart-ments and industry leaders in long-term services and supports (LTSS) throughout Ohio to mitigate the storm. One of the deliverables is a non-credit certificate program for front-line (non-clinical) workers to increase the workers' knowledge about elder care and enhance their interactions with senior-living community residents. Learn how you can become part of the movement to improve the lives of elders in senior-living communities.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherOhio State University. Office of Outreach and Engagementen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCommunity Engagement Conference. The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, January 24–25, 2018.en_US
dc.subjecteldersen_US
dc.subjectfront-lineen_US
dc.subjectworkersen_US
dc.subjecttrainingen_US
dc.titlePutting Elders First: Connections that Impact the Lives of Ohioans in Senior Living Communitiesen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.rights.ccAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United Statesen_US
dc.rights.ccurihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/en_US


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