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dc.creatorWright, Mindy
dc.creatorRuthheiser, Charles
dc.creatorMelsop, Susan
dc.creatorKaye, Gail
dc.creatorHitzhusen, Gregory
dc.creatorWard, Sara
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-19T20:07:58Z
dc.date.available2018-04-19T20:07:58Z
dc.date.issued2018-04
dc.identifier.citationEngaged Scholars, v. 6 (2018).en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/84706
dc.descriptionAt the center of engagement are meaningful partnerships with external groups: industry, government, schools, and nonprofit/community organizations. This panel discusses what makes partnerships between nonprofit/community organizations and higher education unique. Nonprofit assets grow from their embedded, authentic relationships with communities: geographic-based, i.e. east Columbus; issue-based, i.e. public health; or sector-based, i.e. faith. Higher education institutions' missions to educate students to be leaders and engaged citizens and to create knowledge to improve the well-being of our state, region, nation, and globe provide unique opportunities for meaningful partnerships with nonprofits. Charles Rutheiser, Annie E. Casey Foundation, provides a contextual frame from his experience as a practicing research anthropologist at a university and his work with a philanthropy helping universities develop an authentic and responsive relationships with communities. He provides examples from across the country that show the beginnings of significant change in how these partnerships operate. Faculty and their community partners share examples of partnerships that serve missions of all partners as they work for health and wellness: Susan Melsop, Department of Design and Jackie Calderone, Transit Arts, discuss a partnership of the Department of Design and Central Community House, an east side settlement house. At its heart is a service-learning course that engages Transit Arts urban youth with university students in design-build activities to restore a historic building. Presenters share aspects that impact university student learning, extend education to urban youth, provide a nonprofit partner design service, and advance scholarship in community-engaged learning. Gail L. Kaye and Dawn Williams, College of Public Health, and Julie McMahon, Susan G. Komen Foundation, Columbus discuss how the College of Public Health systematically engages with nonprofits as a part of its academic programs. Undergraduate and graduate students complete applied experiences (capstone, practicum and culminating projects) at nonprofit organizations. Many are non-funded opportunities; some involve research. Learning agreements are developed that serve to both expand the capacity of the NPO and facilitate student learning. Greg Hitzhusen, School of Environmental and Natural Resources (SENR) and Sara Ward, Ohio Interfaith Power and Light (OhioIPL), discuss how Ohio IPL partners with SENR and the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center to provide environment and sustainability resources to Ohioans through faith communities. A primary initiative has been co-sponsorship of a biennial "Earthkeeping Summit" to provide information, resources, and inspiration to Ohio communities engaged in energy efficiency projects, environmental justice, urban agriculture, and clean energy systems. Next steps include regional focus groups/surveys and creation of the next Summit.en_US
dc.descriptionAUTHOR AFFILIATION: Charles Ruthheiser, Annie E. Casey Foundation; Mindy Wright, Senior Outreach Coordinator, Outreach and Engagement, wirhgt.7@osu.edu (Corresponding Author); Susan Melsop, Associate Professor, Department of Design; Gail Kaye, Associate Professor of Clinical Public Health, Director of Undergraduate Programs, College of Public Health; Gregory Hitzhusen, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice, School of Environment and Natural Resources; Sara Ward, Executive Director, Ohio Interfaith Power and Light.en_US
dc.description.abstractNonprofit assets grow from their embedded, authentic relationships with communities: geographic-based (i.e. east Columbus); issue-based (i.e. public health); or sector-based (i.e. faith). The mission of higher education institutions to educate students to be leaders and engaged citizens and to create knowledge to improve the well-being of our state, region, nation, and globe provides unique opportunities for meaningful partnerships with nonprofits. Charles Rutheiser with the Annie E Casey Foundation sets a national context for such partnerships. Susan Melsop, Department of Design; Jackie Calderone, Transit Arts; Gail L. Kaye and Dawn Williams, College of Public Health; Julie McMahon, Susan G. Komen Foundation; Greg Hitzhusen, School of Environment and Natural Resources; and Sara Ward, Ohio Interfaith Power and Light, will discuss examples of their meaningful partnerships and make the case for the value of nonprofit/higher education partnerships.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherOhio State University. Office of Outreach and Engagementen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCommunity Engagement Conference. The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, January 24–25, 2018.en_US
dc.subjectnonprofitsen_US
dc.subjectcommunity organizationsen_US
dc.subjectdesignen_US
dc.subjectpublic healthen_US
dc.subjectenvironmental scienceen_US
dc.titleThe Case for Supporting Communities through Nonprofits/Higher Education Partnershipsen_US
dc.title.alternativeFaith Community Partnerships with Ohio Interfaith Power and Lighten_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


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