Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMenon, Usha
dc.creatorSarvarova, Roza
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-29T15:37:22Z
dc.date.available2015-04-29T15:37:22Z
dc.date.issued2015-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/68747
dc.description.abstractSouth Asian Americans (SAA) Americans (from Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka) were one of the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States in the last two decades. However, this group has been understudied in the field of mental health. Cultural expression of symptoms of mental illness in SAA may vary significantly from westernized culture, or symptoms may cluster in different ways in different ethnic groups. Acquiring more information about the health-seeking behavior of SAA may help to promote culturally appropriate health care and education, and improve health outcomes for this minority group. The purpose of this secondary analysis is to determine the relationships between acculturation, medical mistrust, family resources, demographics and anxiety and depression in SAA. The parent study employed a cross-sectional, descriptive design with 330 SAA interviewed in English, Hindi, or Gujarati. The mean age of the participants was 58.9 years, the majority were married, and from India. The mean age of the participants was 58.9 years, the majority were married, and from India. Depression was related to the acculturation subscale of language; medical mistrust; the money, basic needs, and time subscales of family resources; and quantity and quality of social support, and being Hindu. Higher mean anxiety was significantly related to age, medical mistrust, money, basic needs, and time, quantity and quality of social support. In the final regression analyses, depression was predicted by gender, medical mistrust and having a regular physician, while anxiety was predicted only by having a regular physician.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Ohio State Universityen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesThe Ohio State University. College of Nursing Honors Theses; 2015en_US
dc.subjectSouth Asianen_US
dc.subjectanxietyen_US
dc.subjectdepressionen_US
dc.subjectmental healthen_US
dc.subjectacculturationen_US
dc.titleA secondary analysis of acculturation, anxiety and depression among South Asian immigrantsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.embargoNo embargoen_US
dc.description.academicmajorAcademic Major: Nursingen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

Items in Knowledge Bank are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record