Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKinney, Daryl
dc.creatorGaal, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-02T18:29:54Z
dc.date.available2015-04-02T18:29:54Z
dc.date.issued2015-03-25
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/68010
dc.descriptionArt/Architecture: 1st Place (The Ohio State University Denman Undergraduate Research Forum)en_US
dc.description.abstractThroughout history, music has been used to express thoughts, emotions, and ideas that are rooted in cultural perspectives. Since Jamaica declared its independence from England in 1962, the country has been plagued by violent crime, drug trafficking, poverty, and an unstable government and has struggled to create a unified national identity separate from that of the colonial system. Music, as is with any culture, has been an invaluable entity in helping to define the people of the once colonized nation. However, scholars point to a disconnect between the cultural music of Jamaica (e.g. ska, reggae, dance hall, et al.) and the music that is taught in the schools. This project, which I began in January 2014 in Mandeville, Jamaica, seeks to assess Jamaican music culture, evaluate public school music education, and determine the role of music education in Jamaican society. Data were collected through direct participation in Jamaican schools, community activities, and interviews. By working with the international volunteer organization, Projects Abroad, I was able to teach music at a local area high school and interview nine community members with varying backgrounds about the role and importance of music and music education to them, their communities, and Jamaica as a whole. Results suggest varying opinions on the state of music education in Jamaica and the implications it has on the whole community. The Jamaican government sees music as a subject that can be used to enhance math and literacy but many feel the subject matter fails to connect with the students on a personal level. This study elucidates music education at an international level and shows the importance of culturally relevant music education.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCollege of Arts and Sciences International Research Granten_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAida Carnasa Snow Endowment Funden_US
dc.description.sponsorshipARTS Undergraduate Research Scholarshipen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries2015 Richard J. and Martha D. Denman Undergraduate Research Forum. 20then_US
dc.subjectMusic Educationen_US
dc.subjectJamaicaen_US
dc.subjectCommunityen_US
dc.subjectJamaican Educationen_US
dc.subjectJamaican Cultureen_US
dc.titleMusic and Community in Jamaica: The Impact of Music Education in a Developing Nationen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.type.genrePosteren_US
dc.description.academicmajorAcademic Major: Music - Educationen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

Items in Knowledge Bank are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record