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dc.contributor.advisorFord, Jodi
dc.creatorBeam, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-22T17:58:48Z
dc.date.available2014-04-22T17:58:48Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/59920
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Exposure to secondhand smoke increases health risk in children and adolescents, including asthma, ear infections, and respiratory infections. In 2007, the National Survey of Children’s Health found that 16% of children and adolescents in Ohio were exposed to secondhand smoke in the home compared to 7.6% nationwide and that socioeconomic disparities in exposure were prevalent. The purpose of this study is: (1) to describe the status of exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke in the home among children and adolescents in Ohio, including socioeconomic disparities in exposure using 2011/2012 data, and (2) to explore the change in outcomes from 2007 and 2011/2012. Methods: A descriptive study design was employed using secondary data from the 2007 and 2011/2012 National Survey of Children’s Health. The outcome measure of interest was exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke in the home (yes/no) and the independent variables included indicators of socioeconomic status (e.g. household income to poverty ratio and caregiver level of education). Descriptive analyses were conducted using the Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health- an online analysis program. Results In 2011, 10.3% of children and adolescents in Ohio were exposed to secondhand tobacco in the home compared to 16% in 2007. However, Ohio’s prevalence was higher than the 2011 national average (4.9%). Children from lower socioeconomic households were more likely to be exposed to secondhand smoke in the home compared to those in more socioeconomically advantaged households; findings consistent to those in 2007. In addition, the prevalence of exposure increased as socioeconomic status decreased across the socioeconomic gradient. Conclusions Although rates of exposure to secondhand smoke have declined, large disparities were found between the nation and Ohio and among socioeconomic groups. Thus, efforts to decrease exposure are needed, such as healthcare providers increasing awareness about the dangers of secondhand smoke exposure in the home and programs that target lower income householdsen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Ohio State Universityen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesThe Ohio State University. College of Nursing Honors Theses; 2014en_US
dc.subjectsecondhand smokeen_US
dc.subjectdisparitiesen_US
dc.subjectchildrenen_US
dc.subjectadolescentsen_US
dc.titleChildren and Adolescents’ Exposure to Secondhand Smoke in Ohio Households: Disparities and Trendsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.embargoNo embargoen_US
dc.description.academicmajorAcademic Major: Nursingen_US


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