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dc.creatorWhite, George W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-10-01T01:55:07Z
dc.date.available2005-10-01T01:55:07Z
dc.date.issued1967-07en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Ohio Journal of Science. v67 n4 (July, 1967), 210-217en_US
dc.identifier.issn0030-0950en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/5308
dc.descriptionAuthor Institution: Department of Geology, University of Illinois, Urbana 61801en_US
dc.description.abstractLouis Agassiz published his "glacial theory" in Etudes sur les glaciers in October, 1840. Edward Hitchcock wrote approvingly of the theory in 1841 and reproduced some of the Agassiz plates. Professor Samuel St. John of Western Reserve College reproduced one of the Hitchcock glacier plates and wrote favorably of the theory and described glacial drift in general in the first geology textbook published in Ohio, in 1851 at Hudson. St. John's influence was particularly important in the career of his student, John Strong Newberry, the famous geologist. Newberry's interest in glacial deposits, and especially in the origin of kames, may be traced to St. John, his geology teacher.en_US
dc.format.extent2842468 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsReproduction of articles for non-commercial educational or research use granted without request if credit to The Ohio State University and The Ohio Academy of Science is given.en_US
dc.titleThe First Appearance in Ohio of the Theory of Continental Glaciationen_US


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