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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.18061/1811/52976

dc.creatorCummins, Fred
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-13T00:11:46Z
dc.date.available2012-09-13T00:11:46Z
dc.date.issued2012-01
dc.identifier.citationEmpirical Musicology Review, v7 n1-2 (Jan-Apr 2012), 28-35en_US
dc.identifier.issn1559-5749
dc.identifier.otherEMR0000136a
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.18061/1811/52976
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/52976
dc.description.abstractA brief review is provided of the study of rhythm in speech. Much of that activity has focused on looking for empirical measures that would support the categorization of languages into discrete rhythm ‘types’. That activity has had little success, and has used the term ‘rhythm’ in increasingly unmusical and unintuitive ways. Recent approaches to conversation that regard speech as a whole-body activity are found to provide considerations of rhythm that are closer to the central, musical, sense of the term.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherEmpirical Musicology Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEMR0000136aen_US
dc.subjectrhythmen_US
dc.subjectisochronyen_US
dc.subjectspeech rhythmen_US
dc.titleLooking for Rhythm in Speechen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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