Show simple item record

dc.creatorTownsend, Thomas W.
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-09T19:32:21Z
dc.date.available2012-07-09T19:32:21Z
dc.date.issued2009-12
dc.identifier.citationThe Ohio Journal of Science, v109, n4-5 (December, 2009), 99-103.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0030-0950en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/52459
dc.descriptionAuthor Institution: School of Natural Resources, The Ohio State Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractPaul B. Sears had an eclectic interest in ecosystems, including an active concern for wildlife. His professional training was in botany and ecology, but he was one of the first to recognize and write clearly about wildlife as a resource vitally dependent on soils, plant communities and human land use. He employed his impressive scientific capabilities in active service to practical wildlife conservation as chairman of the Board of the National Audubon Society, member of the Ohio Commission on Conservation and Natural Resources and member of The Ohio Wildlife Council. In these positions and others, he did much to further scientific wildlife management. He probably will be remembered best in wildlife management circles for his insightful insistence that wildlife problems were ecosystem problems generated, and therefore solvable, by humans.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsReproduction of articles for non-commercial educational or research use granted without request if credit to The Ohio State University and The Ohio Academy of Science is given.en_US
dc.titleScientific Wildlife Management in Ohio: The Legacy of Paul B. Searsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

Items in Knowledge Bank are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record