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dc.creatorTiedjens, V. A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-10-01T01:08:17Z
dc.date.available2005-10-01T01:08:17Z
dc.date.issued1965-07en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Ohio Journal of Science. v65 n4 (July, 1965), 227-233en_US
dc.identifier.issn0030-0950en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/5101
dc.descriptionAuthor Institution: Director of Research and Vice President, Growers Chemical Corporation, Milan, Ohioen_US
dc.description.abstractSoil samples from many sections of the United States and Canada show a paucity of available calcium even though the pH reading seems satisfactory. Studies made on these soils show that the pH test, accurate for most purposes, does not indicate the available calcium in the presence of other fertilizer ions. A high pH does not necessarily indicate adequate calcium in the soil.en_US
dc.format.extent722259 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsReproduction of articles for non-commercial educational or research use granted without request if credit to The Ohio State University and The Ohio Academy of Science is given.en_US
dc.titleDoes a Soil Acidity Test as Used in Soil Testing Laboratories Determine our Calcium Need in Ohio Soilen_US


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