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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.18061/1811/49761

dc.creatorLondon, Justin
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-15T16:25:00Z
dc.date.available2011-08-15T16:25:00Z
dc.date.issued2011-01
dc.identifier.citationEmpirical Musicology Review, v6 n1 (Jan 2011), 43-55en_US
dc.identifier.issn1559-5749
dc.identifier.otherEMR000099a
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.18061/1811/49761
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/49761
dc.description.abstractThree experiments explored the relationships between surface rhythmic activity, tactus or beat rate, attentional focus, sensorimotor synchronization (tapping), and tempo perception. All involved a rhythmic standard followed by a comparison; the experimental task was a judgment of “slower, same, or faster.” In Experiment 1 participants simply judged relative speed; they focused on the beat level in Experiment 2, and they tapped along as they made their judgments in Experiment 3. In all three experiments judgments were highly accurate (89-97% correct, relative to beat-level inter-onset interval) when the standard-comparison involved the same pattern/same tempo, and performed similarly for the same pattern at different tempos (80-83% correct). Performance degraded significantly in other contexts, especially for different patterns at the same tempo. A main effect for pattern (two levels: same vs. different) and a pattern x tempo interaction were observed in all three experiments; a main effect for tempo (collapsed to two levels: same vs. different) occurred only in Experiment 1. Analysis of a subset of the experimental conditions indicated that surface activity was of greater salience than the beat level in some contexts. Tapping along (Experiment 3) did not improve overall performance any more than simply focusing on the tactus level (Experiment 2), and a possible biasing effect of tapping rate on tempo judgment was observed. Thus there is an apparent dissociation between tactus rate, attentional focus, tapping behavior and tempo judgment. This suggests that our perception of musical speed or tempo is more than simple apprehension of the tactus rate.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherEmpirical Musicology Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEMR000099aen_US
dc.subjectrhythmen_US
dc.subjectmeteren_US
dc.subjecttempoen_US
dc.subjecttappingen_US
dc.subjectbeaten_US
dc.subjecttactusen_US
dc.subjectattentionen_US
dc.titleTactus ≠ Tempo: Some Dissociations Between Attentional Focus, Motor Behavior, and Tempo Judgmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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