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dc.creatorGluibizzi, Amanda
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-02T11:31:34Z
dc.date.available2011-08-02T11:31:34Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationAmanda Gluibizzi, "The Aesthetics and Academics of Graphic Novels and Comics," Art Documentation 26, no. 1 (2007): 28-30.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0730-7187
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/49708
dc.descriptionRevision of a paper presented at the ARLIS/NA Annual Conference in Banff, May 2006.en_US
dc.description.abstractIf anything, the Danish cartoon controversy during the winter of 2006 proved that comics and sequential art hold important places in our lives. While photography and film often still bear the conviction that they are objective — even in this day of digital enhancement and manipulation — drawings show evidence of the human hand and point directly to the person who made them and who may believe in what was drawn. It is therefore important that librarians, and art librarians in particular, become informed about this medium which proves so significant to our patrons and, occasionally, the world.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArt Libraries Society of North Americaen_US
dc.titleThe Aesthetics and Academics of Graphic Novels and Comicsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.osuauthorgluibizzi.2


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