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dc.creatorSteber, Amanda L.en_US
dc.creatorNeill, Justin L.en_US
dc.creatorMuckle, Matthew T.en_US
dc.creatorPate, Brooks H.en_US
dc.creatorPlusquellic, D. F.en_US
dc.creatorLattanzi, V.en_US
dc.creatorSpezzano, S.en_US
dc.creatorMcCarthy, M. C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-12T14:30:50Z
dc.date.available2010-07-12T14:30:50Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier2010-TC-10en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/46417
dc.descriptionAuthor Institution: Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, McCormick Rd., P.O. Box 400319, Charlottesville, VA 22904; Optical Technology Division, NIST, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8441; Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138, and School of Engineering \& Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford St., Cambridge MA 02138en_US
dc.description.abstractBroadband microwave spectra often contain overlapping spectra from a large number of species in the sample mixture, whether in the study of conformational isomers, molecular complexes, reaction products from reactive molecular sources (\textit{e.g.}, electrical discharge), or analysis of chemical mixtures. In these experiments, the identification of individual spectra in the full spectrum through pattern recognition becomes difficult when there is a high density of transitions. Strategies for extracting individual spectra from broadband measurements are discussed. Two approaches for microwave-microwave double resonance spectroscopy have been evaluated. One uses a transition-by-transition screening in a narrowband cavity spectrometer to identify an unknown spectrum and has a time advantage from the increased sensitivity of cavity spectroscopy. The second double-resonance approach uses a broadband spectral editing approach that gives a multiplex advantage in the detection. Both of these experimental techniques are combined with computer-aided assignment algorithms to make the spectral assignment in a minimum of double-resonance observations. The performance of spectral analysis solely using computer-aided assignment is also evaluated. The potential for fully automated spectral decomposition of the broadband spectrum of a complex mixture will be described.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherOhio State Universityen_US
dc.titleSTRATEGIES FOR COMPLEX MIXTURE ANALYSIS IN BROADBAND MICROWAVE SPECTROSCOPYen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.typeImageen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


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