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dc.creatorBelant, Jerrold L.
dc.creatorWindels, Steve K.
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-12T18:57:41Z
dc.date.available2010-02-12T18:57:41Z
dc.date.issued2007-04
dc.identifier.citationThe Ohio Journal of Science, v107, n2 (April, 2007), 16-18.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0030-0950en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/44812
dc.descriptionAuthor Institution: National Park Service, Pictured Rocks Science Centeren_US
dc.descriptionAuthor Institution: School of Forest Resources & Environmental Sciences, Michigan Technological Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractWe compared the efficacy of Victor® Tin Cat® and Sherman live traps for capturing small mammals in northern hardwood and red pine (Pinus resinosa) stands in the north-central Upper Peninsula of Michigan during 2001. Overall mean capture rates (total captures/100 adjusted trap nights) by habitat were greater (P <0.030) for Sherman traps than for Tin Cat traps. Capture rates remained lower for Tin Cat traps in northern hardwood (P = 0.004) but not red pine (P = 0.936) habitat after adjusting for species (sciurids) unable to enter them. Greater species diversity values were obtained using Sherman traps in both habitats. We conclude that in sampling arrays tested, Victor Tin Cat traps were less effective than Sherman traps for estimating small mammal abundance and diversity.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsReproduction of articles for non-commercial educational or research use granted without request if credit to The Ohio State University and The Ohio Academy of Science is given.en_US
dc.titleEfficacy of a Multiple-Capture Live Trap for Small Mammalsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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