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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.18061/1811/44662

dc.creatorLondon, Justin
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-06T21:02:57Z
dc.date.available2010-01-06T21:02:57Z
dc.date.issued2009-10
dc.identifier.citationEmpirical Musicology Review, v4 n4 (October 2009), 151-157en_US
dc.identifier.issn1559-5749
dc.identifier.otherEMR000079b
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.18061/1811/44662
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/44662
dc.description.abstractIn “National Metrical Types in Nineteenth Century Art Song” Leigh Van Handel gives a sympathetic critique of William Rothstein’s claim that in western classical music of the late 18th and 19th centuries there are discernable differences in the phrasing and metrical practice of German versus French and Italian composers. This commentary (a) examines just what Rothstein means in terms of his proposed metrical typology, (b) questions Van Handel on how she has applied it to a purely melodic framework, (c) amplifies Van Handel’s critique of Rothstein, and then (d) concludes with a rumination on the reach of quantitative (i.e., statistically-driven) versus qualitative claims regarding such things as “national metrical types.”en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherEmpirical Musicology Reviewen_US
dc.subjectphrase rhythmsen_US
dc.subjectaccenten_US
dc.subjectinfluenceen_US
dc.subjecthistoricismen_US
dc.subjectempiricismen_US
dc.titleStatistical versus Musical Significance: Commentary on Leigh VanHandel's 'National Metrical Types in Nineteenth Century Art Song'en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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