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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.18061/1811/36607

dc.creatorTierney, Adam T.
dc.creatorBergeson, Tonya R.
dc.creatorPisoni, David B.
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T20:46:52Z
dc.date.available2009-04-01T20:46:52Z
dc.date.issued2009-01
dc.identifier.citationEmpirical Musicology Review, v4 n1 (January 2009), 37-39en
dc.identifier.issn1559-5749
dc.identifier.otherEMR000059c
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.18061/1811/36607
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/36607
dc.description.abstractTierney et al. (2008) reported that musicians performed better on an auditory sequence memory task when compared to non-musicians, but the two groups did not differ in performance on a sequential visuo-spatial memory task. Schellenberg (2008) claims that these results can be attributed entirely to differences in IQ. This explanation, however, cannot account for the fact that the musicians’ advantage was modality-specific.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmpirical Musicology Reviewen
dc.subjectmemory spanen
dc.subjectmusical trainingen
dc.subjectgeneral aptitudeen
dc.subjectmusic performanceen
dc.subjectskilled musiciansen
dc.subjectsequence learningen
dc.titleGeneral Intelligence and Modality-specific Differences in Performance: A Response to Schellenberg (2008)en
dc.typeArticleen


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