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dc.contributorOhio State University. Water Resources Center
dc.creatorStiefel, Robert C.
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-04T17:23:59Z
dc.date.available2009-03-04T17:23:59Z
dc.date.issued1985-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/36456
dc.descriptionThe research on which the report is based was financed in part by the United States Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, through the Ohio Water Resources Center.en
dc.descriptionReport No. G-926-01en
dc.descriptionTitle from facsimile cover pageen
dc.description.abstractWater is one of Ohio's most important natural resources, and the State has an abundant supply to meet its immediate needs. Most of Ohio's water problems are associated with water quality. Of concern are the sediments, nutrients and acids in the surface waters from urban, agricultural and mining areas and the toxic and hazardous wastes that threaten the ground and surface waters. The focus of the 1984 State Water Research Program was directed at some of these needs. One project investigated the operational parameters of a fluidized bed bioreactor for the treatment of a wastewater to establish the optimal design and operating criteria for the unit. Three of the projects explored the significance of phosphorus to the State's surface water quality: one developed a technique to estimate the amount of dissolved phosphorus being transport by agricultural runoff; a second better defined the role that agricultural herbicides have in inhibiting photosynthesis and the removal of nutrients in streams in the Lake Erie Basin, and a third investigated the relationships that exist between bioavailable and nonbioavailable particulate phosphorus in Lake Erie. Other projects attempted to manipulate the fish population in the Lake by changing the type of habitat within the regions managed wetlands by altering the depth of water; and explored the quantities of materials involved in the transport of sediment and nutrients from the Lake Erie shoreline to the off-shore waters. The Center's technology transfer program assisted in the development of a computer program to estimate the soil loss resulting from surface runoff on agricultural lands.en
dc.description.tableofcontentsAbstract -- Water Problems and Issues of Ohio -- Program Goals and Priorities -- Research Project Synopses -- Information Transfer Activities -- Cooperative Arrangements -- Training Accomplishmentsen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherOhio State University. Water Resources Centeren
dc.relation.ispartofseriesReport (Ohio State University. Water Resources Center) ; no. G-926-01en
dc.subject.lcshOhio State University. Water Resources Centeren
dc.subject.lcshWater quality management -- Ohioen
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater -- Ohioen
dc.subject.lcshWater resources development -- Ohioen
dc.titleAnnual Program Report Fiscal Year 1984en
dc.title.alternativeFiscal Year 1984 Program Reporten
dc.typeBooken


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