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dc.creatorHansen, Wilburn
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-14T17:25:18Z
dc.date.available2009-01-14T17:25:18Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationEarly Modern Japan: An Interdisciplinary Journal v. 16 (2008), p. 92-103en
dc.identifier.issn1940-7955 (online)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/36281
dc.description.abstractThis article seeks to suggest in detail how Chinese medical practices became acceptable to the nineteenth-century nativist Hirata Atsutane, whose extreme anti-Chinese bias made such acceptance highly problematic. A related goal is to introduce the little-known medical contributions of Atsutane, who has formerly been seen only as a nationalist pedagogue. This short examination of his writings on medicine attempts to illuminate nineteenth-century opinions concerning what we today would identify as faith healing and traditional Chinese herbal medical practices.en
dc.description.sponsorshipEarly Modern Japan Networken
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe Ohio State Universityen
dc.subjectHirata, Atsutane, 1776-1843en
dc.subjectMedicine -- Japan -- Historyen
dc.subjectHistory of medicine -- Japanen
dc.titleThe Dao of Nineteenth-Century Japanese Nativist Healing: A Chinese Herbal Supplement to Faith Healingen
dc.typeArticleen


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