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dc.contributor.advisorZerby, Henry
dc.contributor.advisorMoeller, Steve
dc.creatorPittman, Curtis
dc.date.accessioned2008-12-02T14:47:32Z
dc.date.available2008-12-02T14:47:32Z
dc.date.issued2008-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/35921
dc.description.abstractAs the pork industry tries to maintain and expand its market share, it is important to produce pork products that provide both a healthful and enjoyable eating experience. Tenderness and flavor are two of the most influential factors contributing to consumer ratings of meat palatability. It is generally accepted that pork chops with greater amounts of marbling (intramuscular fat; IMF) tend to have a greater amount of flavor; however, there is also a growing number of consumers seeking leaner meat, as part of a lower calorie diet. Low, medium, and high IMF pork loin chops were used to determine: a) if differing levels of IMF correspond with differing fatty acid profiles and cholesterol content, and b) if IMF provides protection against overcooking, with regard to maintaining a tender product. Fourteen whole pork loins were obtained from commercial processing facilities for each of the Low (< 1.5%), Medium (4.0 to 4.5%), and High (> 8%) IMF levels (total n = 42). Loins were selected to represent variation in three fresh pork quality characteristics (Minolta L* - color values ranging from an Minolta L* of 46 to 64; ultimate pH – pH ranging from 5.3 to 6.5; and intramuscular fat - ranging from 0.8 to 12.0%). Loins were then aged for a period of 7 to 10 days postmortem and sliced to obtain 12 pork loin chops (2.54 cm thick). Four chops from each loin were used to evaluate fatty acid profile and cholesterol level. The remaining eight chops were used to evaluate tenderness (via two shear force methods), at two end-point temperatures (68.3º C and 73.8º C), utilizing two cooking methods ((George Foreman Grill and a gas grill). Data is currently being collected and results are pending.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Ohio State University Department of Animal Sciencesen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe Ohio State Universityen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesThe Ohio State University. Department of Animal Sciences Honors Theses; 2008en
dc.subjectPork marblingen
dc.titleComparison of Low, Medium, and High Marbling Pork Loin Chops: lipid content and resulting tendernessen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.embargoNo embargoen


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