Show simple item record

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.18061/1811/24065

dc.creatorMorton, Eugene S.
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-12T22:59:41Z
dc.date.available2006-09-12T22:59:41Z
dc.date.issued2006-07
dc.identifier.citationEmpirical Musicology Review, v1 n3 (July 2006), 178-179en
dc.identifier.issn1559-5749
dc.identifier.otherEMR000011b
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.18061/1811/24065
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/24065
dc.description.abstractIncreasingly, the Arts and Humanities and Science fields are finding common ground, as illustrated in Huron et al.’s fine paper. My commentary discusses the origin of the idea that pitch and motivation have an evolved relationship. Their finding that loudness and aggression are related has been little studied in animals and I suggest an explanation from the biological literature.en
dc.format.extent134349 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmpirical Musicology Reviewen
dc.subjectexpressive size symbolismen
dc.subjectmotivation-structural rulesen
dc.subjectpitchen
dc.subjectloudnessen
dc.titleCommentary on "The Influence of Pitch Height on the Perception of Submissiveness and Threat in Musical Passages" by David Huron, Daryl Kinney, and Kristin Precodaen
dc.typeArticleen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

Items in Knowledge Bank are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record