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dc.creatorKane, Douglas D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-07T18:31:31Z
dc.date.available2006-07-07T18:31:31Z
dc.date.issued2002-12en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Ohio Journal of Science. v102, n5 (December, 2002), 110-112en_US
dc.identifier.issn0030-0950en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/23941
dc.descriptionAuthor Institution: Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, The Ohio State Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractAS with the works of a number of Italian Renaissance artists, Lorenzo Ghiberti's art contained scientific elements. In his case both his training as a goldsmith, which introduced him to concepts of mineralogy, and his knowledge and use of techniques in the realm of the science of optics demonstrated a melding of art and science. Ghiberti's Gates of Paradise was among the first works of the period to use a true scientific study of perspective and space. The greatness ascribed to these bronze doors for the Baptistery of San Giovanni in Florence is due not only to Ghiberti's artistic merits, but also to the science that was behind the doors' sense of perspective and space.en_US
dc.format.extent361827 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.titleResearch Report Science in the Art of the Italian Renaissance I: Ghiberti's Gates of Paradise- Linear Perspective and Spaceen_US


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