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dc.creatorWinnewisser, M.en_US
dc.creatorDe Lucia, Frank C.en_US
dc.creatorHerbst, E.en_US
dc.creatorSastry, K. V. L. N.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-06-15T20:26:54Z
dc.date.available2006-06-15T20:26:54Z
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier2002-TB-11en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/20565
dc.descriptionAuthor Institution: Department of Physics, The Ohio State University; Department of Physics, University of New Brunswicken_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough most organic molecules found in interstellar clouds are unsaturated in nature, saturated and near-saturated molecules are detected in so-called ``hot-core'' sources near the sites of high-mass star formation. One molecule searched for in such sources is glycine, the simplest amino acid and the amino derivative of acetic acid, but the results of this search have been ambiguous. Because there is more methyl formate than acetic acid in hot-core sources, it is reasonable to search for an amino derivative of methyl formate, the internal rotor known as methyl carbamate. The lowest energy, or syn, con-former of this species has heretofore only been studied at frequencies through 40 GHz. Using our fast-scan spectrometer (``FASSST''), we have measured and analyzed many new lines of the rotational-torsional spectrum of methyl carbamate in the ground torsional state of the syn conformer. Our new laboratory measurements should make it possible to search for this species in space.en_US
dc.format.extent212131 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeimage/jpeg
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.publisherOhio State Universityen_US
dc.titleTHE MILLIMETER- AND SUBMILLIMETER-WAVE SPECTRUM OF METHYL CARBAMATE $(H_{2}NCOOCH_{3})$en_US
dc.typearticleen_US


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