Show simple item record

dc.creatorCrosley, David R.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-06-15T14:36:40Z
dc.date.available2006-06-15T14:36:40Z
dc.date.issued1980en_US
dc.identifier1980-WE-1en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1811/11439
dc.descriptionAuthor Institution:en_US
dc.description.abstractOf the several laser spectroscopic probe techniques recently developed for studying combustion processes, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is the one especially suited for the detection of transient species present at low concentration. These molecules, often free radicals, play a paramount role in the reaction networks of flames, and their measurement is thus important in developing an understanding of combustion chemistry. To date, about twenty such species have been observed using LIF in flow systems and/or in flames; of these, the ubiquitous OH molecule is by far the most popular. This overview will consider some of the flame experiments from the standpoints both of combustion research needs and the spectroscopy involved. The problems, and various remedies, in accounting for the influence of collisional energy transfer and quenching on the observed LIF signals will be discussed. Finally, some ramifications of LIF--optogalvanic effects, optoacoustic effects, and multiphoton excitation in flames--will be briefly treated.en_US
dc.format.extent96504 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeimage/jpeg
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.publisherOhio State Universityen_US
dc.titleLASER INDUCED FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY IN COMBUSTION STUDIESen_US
dc.typearticleen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

Items in Knowledge Bank are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record