OSU Navigation Bar

The Ohio State University University Libraries Knowledge Bank

The Knowledge Bank is scheduled for regular maintenance on Sunday, April 20th, 8:00 am to 8:00 pm EDT. During this time users will not be able to register, login, or submit content.

We Were Cadets: ROTC Socialization vs. Self-Selection in the development of Army Officers

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/6530

Show full item record

Files Size Format View
Submitted_Form_of_Paper.pdf 257.3Kb PDF View/Open

Title: We Were Cadets: ROTC Socialization vs. Self-Selection in the development of Army Officers
Creators: Whittenberger, Kris
Advisor: Curry, Timothy
Issue Date: 2006-06
Abstract: The following thesis looks at the socialization process of Army ROTC Cadets at The Ohio State University. While training to become Army Officers, Cadets go through many trials and epiphanies before they reach graduation. I studied which disposition had the greater impact on the development of process, self-selection to become an officer before military involvement, or the socialization process experienced through ROTC training. Some theorists predict self-selection is the most important because the military is a voluntary system, however others argued that involvement in training socializes Soldiers into adapting the beliefs and values of the Army as their own. To find the answer, I used my own life history and then interviewed 10 Cadets who were at the end of their ROTC journey. From my own experiences I believed socialization was the most critical element of officer development, however after compiling the interview results I found more Cadets were influenced by either self-selection or a mix of self-selection and socialization.
Series/Report no.: The Ohio State University. Department of Criminology Honors Theses; 2006
Keywords: Socialization
Self-Selection
ROTC
Cadets
Army
Officership
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/6530
Bookmark and Share
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Generic This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License:
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Generic