Makers and Markers of Distinction: Technology and Amish Differentiation in the 1935-1936 Study of Consumer Expenditures

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Title: Makers and Markers of Distinction: Technology and Amish Differentiation in the 1935-1936 Study of Consumer Expenditures
Creators: Reschly, Steven
Keywords: Amish
technology
Study of Consumer Purchases
group differentiation
church discipline
1930s
Lancaster County, PA
Issue Date: 2014-04
Publisher: Ohio State University. Libraries
Citation: Journal of Amish and Plain Anabaptist Studies v. 2, no. 1 (2014), p. 125-146.
Abstract: Plain groups differentiate themselves from the world, and from one another, by technology. It is worth recalling, however, that before the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Amish farmers and artisans used the same technologies as their neighbors, and were often more advanced than those around them in agricultural techniques and tools. This article examines the early development of technological differences as markers of subcultural boundaries based the massive Study of Consumer Purchases (S.C.P.) conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in the U.S. Department of Labor, and the Bureau of Home Economics in the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1935 and 1936.
URI: https://doi.org/10.18061/1811/59685
http://hdl.handle.net/1811/59685
ISSN: 2471-6383
Rights: The author retains copyright ownership of this article. Permission to reuse, publish, or reproduce beyond the bounds of Fair Use or other exemptions to copyright law must be obtained from the author.
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