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Cartography, territory, property: postcolonial reflections on indigenous counter-mapping in Nicaragua and Belize

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/52137

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dc.creator Wainwright, Joel
dc.creator Bryan, Joe
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-02T18:27:41Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-02T18:27:41Z
dc.date.issued 2009-04
dc.identifier.citation Joel Wainwright and Joe Bryan, "Cartography, territory, property: postcolonial reflections on indigenous counter-mapping in Nicaragua and Belize," Cultural Geographies 16, no. 2 (2009): 153-178. doi:10.1177/1474474008101515 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1474-4740 (print)
dc.identifier.issn 1477-0881 (online)
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1811/52137
dc.description.abstract The attention given to indigenous peoples' use of maps to make claims to land and rights of self-government raises the question: what exactly it is that these maps do? This paper outlines an analytic for examining indigenous mapping projects, drawing upon two prominent instances - by the Maya of Belize and the Mayangna community of Awas Tingni in Nicaragua - where human rights lawsuits have been woven together with participatory mapping. In each case, map-making was intricately linked to the formulation of legal claims, resulting in a pair of much-celebrated maps and legal precedents regarding the recognition of indigenous land rights. We argue that these strategies do not reverse colonial social relations so much as they rework them. Notwithstanding the creativity expressed through these projects, they remain oriented by the spatial configuration of modern politics: territory and property rights. This spatial configuration both accounts for and limits the power of indigenous cartography. This impasse is not a contradiction that can be resolved; rather, it constitutes an aporia for which there is no easy or clear solution. Nonetheless, it must be confronted. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher SAGE en_US
dc.title Cartography, territory, property: postcolonial reflections on indigenous counter-mapping in Nicaragua and Belize en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1177/1474474008101515
dc.identifier.osuauthor wainwright.11