OSU Navigation Bar

The Ohio State University University Libraries Knowledge Bank

The Knowledge Bank is scheduled for regular maintenance on Sunday, April 20th, 8:00 am to 12:00 pm EDT. During this time users will not be able to register, login, or submit content.

Differences 
in
 the
 Amount 
of
 Time 
Spent 
on 
Food
 Shopping,
 Preparation 
and
 Consumption
 by 
Obesity
 Status
 in
 US 
Adults


Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/51880

Show full item record

Files Size Format View
LaurenVorisekThesis.pdf 165.7Kb PDF View/Open

Title: Differences 
in
 the
 Amount 
of
 Time 
Spent 
on 
Food
 Shopping,
 Preparation 
and
 Consumption
 by 
Obesity
 Status
 in
 US 
Adults

Creators: Vorisek, Lauren
Advisor: Nahikian-Nelms, Marcia; Taylor, Christopher
Issue Date: 2012-06
Abstract: Increase in obesity across the US has drawn focus to the food selection, purchasing and preparation patterns that could influence energy balance. Dining outside of the home and an increase in convenience foods has been attributed to nutritional changes in US food patterns. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine differences in the amount of time adults spent on food shopping and preparation to identify differences by age and obesity status. Data from 21,946 adults from the 2006-2008 American Time Use Survey were selected for the analyses. Adults were stratified into two age groups, 20-35 years and 36-55 years. Body mass index data (kg/m2) were recoded into normal weight (NW, 18.5-24.9), overweight (OW, 25-29.9) and obesity (OB, >=30); with the focus on obesity. Underweight adults were excluded from the analyses. Activity record codes attributable to time spent food shopping, on preparation and clean-up as well as eating were summed across individuals. OW adults spent significantly less time shopping for food than NW and OB (P=<0.005), while NW spent significantly more time eating than OW and OB adults (P=<0.008). Food preparation represented less than one-third of the time spent on food, with the greatest amount of time spent by older NW adults. These data suggest significant differences in the time investment into dietary habits by age and weight status in US adults; further research is needed to examine time spent on specific dietary habits, which may contribute to obesity risk.
Embargo: No embargo
Series/Report no.: The Ohio State University. Division of Medical Dietetics Honors Theses; 2012
Keywords: obesity
health behaviors
nutrition
time usage
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/51880
Bookmark and Share