OSU Navigation Bar

The Ohio State University University Libraries Knowledge Bank

How Residential Change Might Help Ex-Offenders Stay Out of Prison: Findings from a Natural Experiment

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/51862

Show simple item record

Files Size Format View Description
IEJ-kbdirect-KirkD-20120309-rm.html 552bytes HTML View/Open Video (RealPlayer version)
IEJ-kbdirect-KirkD-20120309-wmv.html 561bytes HTML View/Open Video (Windows Media version)
IEJ-kbdirect-KirkD-20120309-flv.html 555bytes HTML View/Open Video (Flash version)

dc.contributor Rhine, Edward
dc.contributor Bellair, Paul E.
dc.creator Kirk, David S.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-05-18T22:17:51Z
dc.date.available 2012-05-18T22:17:51Z
dc.date.issued 2012-03-09
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1811/51862
dc.description Video requires Windows Media Player, RealPlayer, or Flash Player to view. en_US
dc.description.abstract Institute for Excellence in Justice Seminar: How Residential Change Might Help Ex-Offenders Stay Out of Prison: Findings from a Natural Experiment, March 9, 2012 at the Frank W. Hale Black Cultural Center, The Ohio State University. Presentation by Dr. David Kirk, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Texas-Austin. Joined by expert panelists Dr. Edward Rhine (Deputy Director, Office of Policy and Offender Reentry, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction) and Dr. Paul Bellair (Professor of Sociology at OSU). Abstract: Many former prisoners return home to the same neighborhood with the same criminal opportunities and criminal peers they had before they went to prison. Yet, if the path to a crime-free life largely requires knifing-off from past situations and establishing new routines, then separating returning offenders from their past criminal contexts may be one way to reduce recidivism and foster desistance. Professor David Kirk explores the idea of residential change by examining how Hurricane Katrina affected ex-prisoners originally from New Orleans and their likelihood of returning to prison. Kirk discusses potential strategies for fostering residential change among ex-prisoners, focusing specifically on parole residency policies and greater access to housing. en_US
dc.description.tableofcontents Video: Welcome and Introductions (00:00:00-00:04:49); Presentation - Dr. David S. Kirk, University of Texas at Austin (00:04:50-00:43:51); Discussant - Dr. Edward Rhine, Deputy Director, Office of Policy and Offender Reentry, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction (00:43:52-00:53:50); Discussant - Dr. Paul Bellair, Professor of Sociology, The Ohio State University (00:53:51-00:59:28); Q and A (00:59:29-01:21:07) en_US
dc.format.extent Video duration: 01:21:07 en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Ohio State University. Criminal Justice Research Center en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Institute for Excellence in Justice. Seminars en_US
dc.subject residential change en_US
dc.subject former prisoners en_US
dc.subject recidivism en_US
dc.subject parole residency policies en_US
dc.subject access to housing en_US
dc.title How Residential Change Might Help Ex-Offenders Stay Out of Prison: Findings from a Natural Experiment en_US
dc.type Presentation en_US
dc.type Video en_US
dc.identifier.osuauthor bellair.1