OSU Navigation Bar

The Ohio State University University Libraries Knowledge Bank

Carboniferous of Eastern Kentucky

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/51526

Show full item record

Files Size Format View
IPS_MiscReport_M-228_Part1.pdf 10.58Mb PDF View/Open
IPS_MiscReport_M-228_Part2.pdf 9.815Mb PDF View/Open
IPS_MiscReport_M-228_Part3.pdf 12.40Mb PDF View/Open
IPS_MiscReport_M-228_Part4.pdf 8.707Mb PDF View/Open

Title: Carboniferous of Eastern Kentucky
Contributors: Blodgett, Robert H.; Chaplin, James R.; Lowry-Chaplin, Barbara L.; Lierman, R. Thomas; Mason, Charles E.; Taylor, Thomas N.; Smoot, Edith L.; Haban, Stephanie M.
Keywords: Appalachian Plateau
Field excursions
Kentucky guidebook
Issue Date: 1985
Publisher: Institute of Polar Studies, The Ohio State University.
Citation: Haban, Stephanie M., editor. 1985. Carboniferous of Eastern Kentucky. Institute of Polar Studies Miscellaneous Publication No. 228, Institute of Polar Studies, The Ohio State University, ix, 172 pages.
Series/Report no.: Institute of Polar Studies Miscellaneous Publication No. 228.
Abstract: This guidebook was produced for participants of the Sixth Gondwana Symposium held at the Institute of Polar Studies in August 1985. The trip traverses the highly scenic Appalachian Plateau. Enroute to eastern Kentucky, nonmarine sandstone, mudstone, coal, and limestone of the Upper Carboniferous to Permian (?) Dunkard Group, and Upper Carboniferous Monongahela and Conemaugh Formations will be examined in southern Ohio and western West Virginia. In eastern Kentucky, examination of the rocks will proceed up through the sequence starting with the Lower Carboniferous Berea Sandstone, a shallow marine deposit with abundant sedimentary structures; followed by the Borden Formation, which represents a prograding delta with shelf to basin facies including turbidites and abundant sedimentary structures; followed by the Borden Formation, which represents a prograding delta with shelf to basin facies including turbidites and abundant sedimentary structures, trace, and invertebrate fossils; the Slade Formation, a shallow carbonate sequence with paleokarst and paleosol features, and ending with the Upper Carboniferous Breathitt Formation, a marine to nonmarine sandstone, mudstone, and coal unit with famous coal ball localities.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/51526
Bookmark and Share