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The American Museum of Magic/Lund Memorial Library and Other Resources on Magic and Conjuring

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/50091

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dc.contributor.editor Couch, Nena en_US
dc.creator Kattelman, Beth
dc.date.accessioned 2011-11-14T14:20:02Z
dc.date.available 2011-11-14T14:20:02Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation Beth A. Kattleman, "The American Museum of Magic/Lund Memorial Library and Other Resources on Magic and Conjuring," Theatre Survey 49, no. 2 (2008), doi:10.1017/S0040557408000161 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0040-5574
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1811/50091
dc.description.abstract How did he do that? This question has been on the lips of audience members since magicians first began delighting and amazing viewers with skills of dexterity and legerdemain. The first-known recorded, secular magic performance2 dates back to 2500 B.C. when the conjuror Dedi presented a series of tricks for the Egyptian king Cheops at the royal palace. The event was recorded in the Westcar papyrus, a document that was composed around 1700 B.C. but is thought by Egyptologists to have been copied from earlier sources.3 Yes, magic and conjuring have long been an integral part of popular entertainment, and from these very early beginnings, secular magicians have continued to provide entertainment for audiences of all ages right up through the present day. Magic shows are still some of the hottest tickets of the Las Vegas strip, and touring artists such as David Copperfield can still fill theatres. Magic is also popular on television once again thanks to the work of David Blaine and Criss Angel. Organizations such as the International Brotherhood of Magicians (IBM) and the Society of American Magicians (SAM) also boast a strong membership. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher American Society for Theatre Research en_US
dc.title The American Museum of Magic/Lund Memorial Library and Other Resources on Magic and Conjuring en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1017/S0040557408000161
dc.identifier.osuauthor kattelman.1