OSU Navigation Bar

The Ohio State University University Libraries Knowledge Bank

LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE CO CAMERON BANDS AND VISIBLE EMISSIONS FOLLOWING VUV PHOTODISSOCIATION OF CO${_2}

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/38390

Show full item record

Files Size Format View
abstract.gif 25.74Kb GIF image Thumbnail of LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE CO CAMERON BANDS AND VISIBLE EMISSIONS FOLLOWING VUV PHOTODISSOCIATION OF CO${_2}
Constantin Romanescu CO2 talk.ppt 6.594Mb Microsoft PowerPoint View/Open
Slide1.GIF 49.35Kb GIF image Thumbnail of LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE CO CAMERON BANDS AND VISIBLE EMISSIONS FOLLOWING VUV PHOTODISSOCIATION OF CO${_2}
Slide2.GIF 15.28Kb GIF image Thumbnail of LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE CO CAMERON BANDS AND VISIBLE EMISSIONS FOLLOWING VUV PHOTODISSOCIATION OF CO${_2}
Slide3.GIF 17.70Kb GIF image Thumbnail of LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE CO CAMERON BANDS AND VISIBLE EMISSIONS FOLLOWING VUV PHOTODISSOCIATION OF CO${_2}
Slide4.GIF 18.72Kb GIF image Thumbnail of LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE CO CAMERON BANDS AND VISIBLE EMISSIONS FOLLOWING VUV PHOTODISSOCIATION OF CO${_2}
Slide5.GIF 13.75Kb GIF image Thumbnail of LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE CO CAMERON BANDS AND VISIBLE EMISSIONS FOLLOWING VUV PHOTODISSOCIATION OF CO${_2}
Slide6.GIF 102.8Kb GIF image Thumbnail of LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE CO CAMERON BANDS AND VISIBLE EMISSIONS FOLLOWING VUV PHOTODISSOCIATION OF CO${_2}
Slide7.GIF 19.09Kb GIF image Thumbnail of LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE CO CAMERON BANDS AND VISIBLE EMISSIONS FOLLOWING VUV PHOTODISSOCIATION OF CO${_2}
Slide8.GIF 34.93Kb GIF image Thumbnail of LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE CO CAMERON BANDS AND VISIBLE EMISSIONS FOLLOWING VUV PHOTODISSOCIATION OF CO${_2}
Slide9.GIF 14.22Kb GIF image Thumbnail of LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE CO CAMERON BANDS AND VISIBLE EMISSIONS FOLLOWING VUV PHOTODISSOCIATION OF CO${_2}
Slide10.GIF 16.21Kb GIF image Thumbnail of LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE CO CAMERON BANDS AND VISIBLE EMISSIONS FOLLOWING VUV PHOTODISSOCIATION OF CO${_2}
Slide11.GIF 150.3Kb GIF image Thumbnail of LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE CO CAMERON BANDS AND VISIBLE EMISSIONS FOLLOWING VUV PHOTODISSOCIATION OF CO${_2}
Slide12.GIF 5.562Kb GIF image Thumbnail of LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE CO CAMERON BANDS AND VISIBLE EMISSIONS FOLLOWING VUV PHOTODISSOCIATION OF CO${_2}
Slide13.GIF 5.562Kb GIF image Thumbnail of LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE CO CAMERON BANDS AND VISIBLE EMISSIONS FOLLOWING VUV PHOTODISSOCIATION OF CO${_2}
Slide14.GIF 17.33Kb GIF image Thumbnail of LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE CO CAMERON BANDS AND VISIBLE EMISSIONS FOLLOWING VUV PHOTODISSOCIATION OF CO${_2}

Title: LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE CO CAMERON BANDS AND VISIBLE EMISSIONS FOLLOWING VUV PHOTODISSOCIATION OF CO${_2}
Creators: Kalogerakis, K. S.; Romanescu, C.; Slanger, T. G.; Lee, L. C.; Ahmed, M.; Wilson, K. R.
Issue Date: 2009
Abstract: The CO($\textit{a}^{3}$\Pi-$\textit{X}^{1}$$\Sigma^{+}$) Cameron bands are one of the most important emission features in the UV dayglow of the CO${_2}$ planets, as demonstrated in the case of Mars by the measurements performed by Mariner and Mars Express missions. One of the mechanisms to produce electronically excited CO($\textit{a}$^{3}\Pi$) is photodissociation of CO${_2}$ at wavelengths shorter than 108 nm. At wavelengths below 100 nm, new CO${_2}$ photodissociation channels open leading to formation of higher energy triplet states of CO. These states cascade into the lower triplet state by emission in the visible spectral region before radiating in the Cameron system. This two step relaxation pathway was demonstrated by Lee and Judge, 104 (1973)} for the 90-93 nm photodissociation of CO${_2}$. We have further investigated this process using the 85-110 nm tunable synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The experimental results confirmed that once a triplet state excitation threshold is exceeded, a fraction of the Cameron band emission is accompanied by visible emission. These results indicate that the emission corresponding to the CO($\textit{a}^{\prime}$-\textit{a}, \textit{d}-\textit{a}, \textit{e}-\textit{a}) triplet bands must be part of the visible Mars / Venus dayglow. The same is true for CO${_2}$ photoexcitation in cometary atmospheres. \vspace{1em} This work was supported by the NASA Outer Planets Research Program under grant NNX06AB82G. The Advanced Light Source is supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/38390
Other Identifiers: 2009-WI-15
Bookmark and Share