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A Political-Institutional Model of Real Exchange Rates, Competitiveness, and Division of Labor

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Title: A Political-Institutional Model of Real Exchange Rates, Competitiveness, and Division of Labor
Creators: Iversen, Torben
Contributors: Mann, Melanie
Keywords: exchange rates
real economy
Issue Date: 2009-01-30
Publisher: Ohio State University. Mershon Center for International Security Studies
Abstract: Torben Iversen is Harold Hitchings Burbank Professor of Political Economy in the Department of Government at Harvard University. Iversen's research and teaching interests include comparative political economy, electoral politics, and applied formal theory. He is the author of Capitalism, Democracy, and Welfare (Cambridge University Press, 2005), Contested Economic Institutions (Cambridge University Press, 1999), and co-editor of Unions, Employers and Central Bankers (Cambridge University Press, 2000). Iversen's current work focuses on the political economy of distribution, representation, and economic performance. He is the author or co-author of more than two dozen articles in leading journals such as the American Journal of Political Science, American Political Science Review, Annual Review of Political Science, British Journal of Political Science, Comparative Politics, Comparative Political Studies, International Organization, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Public Choice, Quarterly Journal of Economics, World Politics, and numerous edited volumes. Iversen's work has won five American Political Science Association prizes including Best Book on European Politics and Society, the Luebbert Best Article Award, and the Gabriel Almond Best Dissertation Award. He is currently working on two book-length projects: one on the political representation of economic interests (with David Soskice), and another on the political economy of gender inequality (with Frances Rosenbluth).
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/37879
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