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Exposure and Vulnerability: Child Health as a Vector in the Intergenerational Transmission of Social Position

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/37259

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Title: Exposure and Vulnerability: Child Health as a Vector in the Intergenerational Transmission of Social Position
Creators: Lynch, Jamie
Advisor: Downey, Doug
Issue Date: 2009-04
Abstract: This study investigates the role of child health in the intergenerational transmission of status and the formation of health disparities in educational outcomes prior to formal schooling. Using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study – Birth Cohort, child health is hypothesized to be a product of parental socioeconomic status and race, and to subsequently impact cognitive development, math, and reading prior to kindergarten. In addition race and parental investment are, respectively, hypothesized to moderate and mediate the negative influence of poor child health on learning. Results find evidence of health disparities in cognitive development, math, and literacy skills originating just nine months after birth. Poor child health proves to be an equal opportunity delayer, as children with poor health and racial minority status do not suffer a double disadvantage in early cognitive development. Overall, results emphasize the importance of child health as a critical factor in the intergenerational transmission of social status.
Embargo: No embargo
Series/Report no.: 2009 Edward F. Hayes Graduate Research Forum. 23rd
Keywords: child health
cognitive development
sociology
life course
Description: Education and Human Ecology: 2nd Place (The Ohio State University Edward F. Hayes Graduate Research Forum)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/37259
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