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Colostral, Milk, and Serum Immunoglobulin G Concentrations in Quarter Horse Mares and their Foals from Birth to Weaning

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Title: Colostral, Milk, and Serum Immunoglobulin G Concentrations in Quarter Horse Mares and their Foals from Birth to Weaning
Creators: Kenzig, Allison
Advisor: Cole, Kimberly
Issue Date: 2009-06
Abstract: The failure of passive transfer (FPT) of maternal immunoglobulins, primarily IgG, to the neonatal foal predisposes the foal to potentially life-threatening illnesses. Sufficient protection against these infectious diseases is attained when serum IgG concentrations in a newborn foal are above 800mg/dL. Partial FPT occurs when serum IgG concentrations are between 400 and 800 mg/dL, and failure of passive transfer occurs when serum IgG concentrations are less than 400 mg/dL after 24 hours post-partum. The frequency of FPT occurrence in newborn foals is between 3% and 20%, and several factors have been thought to influence the passive transfer of IgG. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the colostral, milk and serum IgG concentrations in Quarter Horse mares and their foals from birth to weaning, and to determine the correlation, if any, between mare age, number of pregnancies, days of gestation, month foaled, foal sex and IgG concentrations. The majority of correlations found in this study are consistent with previous research in other horse breeds (Kohn et al., 1989; Erhard et al., 2001). However, unique to this study, both positive and negative correlations were found between both mare and foal IgG concentrations and both gestation length and month foaled.
Embargo: No embargo
Series/Report no.: The Ohio State University. Department of Animal Sciences Honors Theses; 2009
Keywords: Immunoglobulin G
Quarter Horse
Sponsors: Veterinary Medical and Research Development (VMRD), Inc.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/37087
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