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Larval Size and Recruitment Mechanisms in Fishes: Toward a Conceptual Framework

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Title: Larval Size and Recruitment Mechanisms in Fishes: Toward a Conceptual Framework
Creators: Miller, Thomas J.; Crowder, Larry B.; Rice, James A.; Marschall, Elizabeth A.
Keywords: fishery recruitment mechanisms
body size
Issue Date: 1988
Citation: Miller, Thomas J.; Crowder, Larry B.; Rice, James A.; Marschall, Elizabeth A. "Larval Size and Recruitment Mechanisms in Fishes: Toward a Conceptual Framework," Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, v. 45, no. 9, 1988, pp. 1657-1670.
Abstract: Understanding the mechanisms controlling recruitment in fishes is a major problem in fisheries science. Although the literature on recruitment mechanisms is large and growing rapidly, it is primarily species specific. There is no conceptual framework to integrate the existing information on larval fish ecology and its relationship to survival and recruitment. In this paper, we propose an integrating framework based on body size. Although all larval fish are small relative to adult fish, total length at hatching differs among species by an order of magnitude. As many of the factors critical to larval survival and growth are size dependent, substantially different expectations arise about which mechanisms might be most important to recruitment success. We examined the evidence for the importance of size to feeding and starvation, to activity and searching ability, and to risk of predation. Regressions based on data from 72 species of marine and freshwater species suggest that body size is an important factor that unifies many of the published observations. A conceptual framework based on body size has the potential to provide a useful integration of the available data on larval growth and survival and a focus for future studies of recruitment dynamics.
Description: Abstract in English and French
ISSN: 1205-7533 (print)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/36989
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