Assessing the monthly cycle of food abundance-shortage cycle in food insecure/overweight-obese women

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Title: Assessing the monthly cycle of food abundance-shortage cycle in food insecure/overweight-obese women
Creators: Ye, Qian
Contributors: Zubieta, Ana Claudia; Mims, Sheryl D.; Remley, Dan; Angell, Deb; Melgar-Quiñonez, Hugo
Keywords: food insecurity
obesity
women
energy intake
food supply
Issue Date: 2009-03-31
Series/Report no.: Human Nutrition. Graduate student poster competition, 2009
Abstract: Background: This study aims to assess a hypothesized monthly cycle of food abundance-shortage among food insecure/overweight-obese (FIS/Ow-Ob) women as a possible explanation to the paradoxical relationship between food insecurity and overweight/obesity. Methods: Overweight and obesity were determined by a Body Mass Index (BMI) ≥ 25. A validated shelf-food inventory was used to determine household food supply, and dietary intakes were measured by 24-hour dietary recalls. Food insecurity was measured using the USDA Household Food Security Supplemental Module (US-HFSSM). Differences in the number of shelf-food items and energy/nutrient intake between week1 and week4 were determined through paired t-tests. Results: 22 women participating in the Ohio Family Nutrition Program (77% overweight/obese, 91% food insecure) were interviewed at the beginning and the end of the month (week1, week4) to determine their dietary energy intake (EI) and household food supply. Among FIS/Ow-Ob women (n=16), the number of shelf-food items (week1: 86.8, week4: 62.6, p=0.0004) and EI (week1: 2157.2 kcal, week4: 1665.9 kcal, p=0.04) decreased significantly when comparing measures at week1 and week4. A significant decrease in fat intake was observed as well (p=0.02). Significant drops were also observed in food supply for food groups of grains, vegetables, fruits, milk, and meat & beans (p≤0.05). Conclusion: These findings suggest the existence of a monthly cycle of food abundance-shortage among FIS/Ow-Ob women, who might be experiencing a caloric overconsumption on week1, when food is more abundant, as a response to the food shortage on week4. Nutrition education and policy interventions are needed to better distribute the available resources throughout the month to avoid such variations.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/36582
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