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Denied and Disparaged: Madisonian Federalism and the Original Meaning of the Ninth Amendment

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Title: Denied and Disparaged: Madisonian Federalism and the Original Meaning of the Ninth Amendment
Creators: Rokosky, Seth
Advisor: Cornell, Saul
Issue Date: 2008-03
Abstract: The Ninth Amendment played an important role in the founding of our nation, but it has long been forgotten and misunderstood. In the last decade, however, scholars have begun to reexamine the history of the Ninth Amendment to determine its original meaning. Ninth Amendment scholarship has primarily been driven by a new debate between Kurt Lash and Randy Barnett. This thesis examines that debate. After concluding that Lash's "federalism" model of the Ninth Amendment is more historically accurate, it explores the "federalism" model's applicability to modern Ninth Amendment jurisprudence, how it relates to the "right to privacy," and the role of originalism in the Ninth Amendment debate.
Embargo: No embargo
Series/Report no.: The Ohio State University. Department of History Honors Theses; 2008
Keywords: Ninth Amendment
Federalism
Retained rights
Reserved powers
Right to privacy
Originalism
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/31866
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