MICROEMBOLI INTRODUCTION WITH VENOUS CANNULA OBSTRUCTION AND VARYING METHODS OF VENOUS DRAINAGE

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Title: MICROEMBOLI INTRODUCTION WITH VENOUS CANNULA OBSTRUCTION AND VARYING METHODS OF VENOUS DRAINAGE
Creators: Rance, Geoffrey
Advisor: Riley, Jeffrey
Issue Date: 2008-03
Abstract: During extracorporeal circulation, negative pressure is generated in the venous cannula and line. Whenever there is negative pressure, the potential exists that gaseous microemboli (GME) will be introduced into the blood, whether it is pulled out of solution or into the cannula through the purse string sutures. This negative pressure is augmented when the vena cava collapses over the tip of the cannula, increasingly the likelihood that GME enter the cannula and venous line. This research aimed to determine if one particular method of venous drainage (siphon, vacuum, or kinetic) causes more GME to be introduced across the venous cannula when the vena cava collapses over the cannula (referred to as “chugging”) than the other methods of drainage. A circuit was constructed that was capable of utilizing all three methods of venous drainage, and used a Penrose drain to simulate the vena cava. GME readings were taken pre and post cannula using the EDAC Quantifier blood circuit monitor. Readings were taken at venous line pressures from zero to -80 mmHg. Chugging began at -40 mmHg. Results showed that upon the onset of chugging there was a transient increase in GME introduction during all three methods of drainage. Vacuum-assisted drainage introduced a statistically significant greater number or GME across the cannula than kinetic or siphon drainage at all negative pressures.
Embargo: No embargo
Series/Report no.: The Ohio State University. School of Allied Medical Professions Honors Theses; 2008
Keywords: microemboli
GME
venous drainage
cardiopulmonary bypass
EDAC
perfusion
Sponsors: School of Allied Medical Professions
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/31828
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