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Field Workshops on Subsurface Fractures in Glacial Till and Their Environmental Implications: An Educational Experience for Professionals and Decision-makers

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/23860

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Title: Field Workshops on Subsurface Fractures in Glacial Till and Their Environmental Implications: An Educational Experience for Professionals and Decision-makers
Creators: Christy, Ann D.; Weatherington-Rice, Julie
Issue Date: 2000-06
Citation: The Ohio Journal of Science. v100, n3-4 (June-September, 2000), 94-99
Abstract: This paper documents the history of the Ohio Fracture Flow Working Group and describes their conceptualization, planning, coordination, and implementation of a unique outdoor field workshop on joints and fractures in glacial till held in London, OH, on 28 August 1997. The one-day event was coordinated and staffed by geologists, soil scientists, well drillers, and engineers. More than 175 people were in attendance, representing local, state and federal agencies, colleges and universities, and the private consulting sector. The field day included a morning lecture series of short plenary presentations and four afternoon field demonstration stations. The field stations included geophysics (downhole gammalogs, surface resistivity arrays), hydraulic conductivity testing (slug tests), two drilling rigs (an angle auger rig and a rotosonic rig), and a series of drilling cores that were described by a glacial geologist, two soil scientists, and a geotechnical engineer, demonstrating the different approaches, terminologies, and classifications that each discipline uses. The final field station was a large three-tiered pit approximately 10m x 25m and 3.7m deep that was used to demonstrate soil profiles and how they were formed, their relationship to the underlying glacial till deposits and the associated polygonal fracture patterns, and the difference in hydraulic conductivity between areas of fractures and areas of no fractures. Participant evaluations were very favorable, and plans are being made for future educational work on fractures.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/23860
ISSN: 0030-0950
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