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Effect of Reclamation Technique on Mammal Communitites Inhabiting Wetlands on Mined Lands in East-Central Ohio

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Title: Effect of Reclamation Technique on Mammal Communitites Inhabiting Wetlands on Mined Lands in East-Central Ohio
Creators: Lacki, Michael J.; Hummer, Joseph W.; Webster, Harold J.
Issue Date: 1991-09
Citation: The Ohio Journal of Science. v91, n4 (September, 1991), 154-158
Abstract: Mammal communities were studied from May through August, 1988 to 1990, at four wetland sites in Coshocton and Muskingum counties, OH. Sites represented varying degrees of disturbance from mining activity and subsequent reclamation techniques, including a wetland constructed to treat mine water drainage. Each site was composed of a series of three cattail (Typba latifolid) cells for a balanced experimental design. Mammals were inventoried with snap trap removal grids and midday surveys for signs of activity. Mammal diversity and richness was highest at the constructed wetland and lowest at the site established with traditional reclamation procedures. Predictable patterns of land use disturbance for species presence/absence were observed with some alpha diversity (habitat specific) species being absent (i.e., tree squirrels) and gamma diversity (wide-ranging) species such as mustelids occurring rarely. Beta diversity species (habitat generalists) like woodchucks (Marmota monax) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) were common at all sites. The white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) was the small mammal captured most frequently, being the most abundant small mammal at the constructed wetland and the undisturbed site, with meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) most prevalent at the remaining sites. These results suggest that a wetland constructed for the treatment of mine water drainage can provide secondary benefits as habitat for a variety of mammal species.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/23462
ISSN: 0030-0950
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