Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 71, Issue 5 (September, 1971)

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Front Matter
pp 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (986KB)

Water Pollution by Oil-Field Brines and Related Industrial Wastes in Ohio
Pettyjohn, Wayne A. pp 257-269
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1280KB)

Book Review
pp 269-269
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Hibernating Ichneumonidae of Ohio (Hymenoptera)
Dasch, Clement E. pp 270-283
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The Position and Age of the Sciotoville Bar Locality, Southern Ohio
Manger, Walter L. pp 284-291
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Book Review
pp 291-291
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The Changing Distribution of the Genus Najas (Najadaceae) in Ohio
Wentz, W. Alan; Stuckey, Ronald L. pp 292-302
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Helminth Parasites of the Red-Winged Blackbird, Agelaius Phoeniceus, and Common Grackle, Quiscalus Quiscula, in Northwestern Ohio
Stanley, Janet G.; Rabalais, Francis C. pp 302-303
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (120KB)

Spore Germination Time in Fuligo Septica
Braun, Karl Leo pp 304-309
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Edaphophyllum Irregularum, a New Middle Devonian Digonophyllid Coral from the Lower Arkona Formation, Ontario, Canada
Mitchell, Steven W.; Driscoll, Egbert G. pp 309-312
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High Lead Concentrations in Columbus Snow
Hamilton, Wayne L.; Miller, James E. pp 313-316
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Book Review
pp 316-316
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The American Upper Ordovician Standard. XVI, Utility of Clastic-Ratio Values to Distinguish Kope and Fairview Formations, Hamilton County, Ohio
Osborne, Robert H. pp 317-319
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Book Reviews
pp 320-320
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Back Matter
pp 999
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  • Item
    Back Matter
    (1971-09)
  • Item
    Book Reviews
    (1971-09)
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    The American Upper Ordovician Standard. XVI, Utility of Clastic-Ratio Values to Distinguish Kope and Fairview Formations, Hamilton County, Ohio
    (1971-09) Osborne, Robert H.
    The result of a Mann-Whitney U-test indicates that clastic-ratio values for the Kope Formation are stochastically greater than are those for the Fairview Formation in eastern Hamilton County, Ohio. The use of the clastic-ratio as an inferential statistic when applied to these formations is justified.
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    Book Review
    (1971-09)
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    High Lead Concentrations in Columbus Snow
    (1971-09) Hamilton, Wayne L.; Miller, James E.
    Lead concentrations in snow collected on the ground within 100 feet of streets and roads in January, 1970, were determined by atomic absorption spectropho tome trie analysis of dissolved and particulate fractions of impurities. Twenty-seven samples of snow were collected over a 20 square-mile, suburban, mainly residential part of Columbus, Ohio. Measured concentrations were between 0.05 and 1.09 ppm Pb, with an average of 0.41 ppm. In all but one sample the lead concentration exceeded the U.S. Public Health Service safe limit for drinking water of 0.05 ppm. The temporal and areal distributions of concentrations, together with a comparison with iron concentrations measured in the same samples, indicated that automobile exhaust was the probable source of the lead.
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    Edaphophyllum Irregularum, a New Middle Devonian Digonophyllid Coral from the Lower Arkona Formation, Ontario, Canada
    (1971-09) Mitchell, Steven W.; Driscoll, Egbert G.
    Edaphophyllum irregularum n. sp., a digonophyllid coral, is described from limestone fragments in glacial drift inferred to represent the Middle Devonian (Traverse Group) Lower Arkona Formation of Ontario, Canada. The species is characterized by the development of a massive sequence of septal cones. This is the first occurrence of Edaphophyllum Simpson in the Michigan Basin.
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    Spore Germination Time in Fuligo Septica
    (1971-09) Braun, Karl Leo
    Fuligo septica spores were selected randomly from six different aethalia collected within fifty feet of one another, on The Ohio State University campus. In each case the specimens were found growing on Paygro, a shredded hardwood-bark mulch used around most of the plantings of the O.S.U. campus. Germination time was determined for the spores of each individual aethalium and comparisons made. The number of spores per cubic millimeter, the pH, and the temperature were also recorded. Germination occurred in from 35 to 92 minutes in spores from all but two of the aethalia, where no germination had occurred as of two hours. The germination times for all spores taken from a single aethalium were found to vary by an average of about +/- 10 min. Spore viability seems to be related not so much to the age of the aethalium as to some condition or set of conditions during the formation of the fructification.
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    Helminth Parasites of the Red-Winged Blackbird, Agelaius Phoeniceus, and Common Grackle, Quiscalus Quiscula, in Northwestern Ohio
    (1971-09) Stanley, Janet G.; Rabalais, Francis C.
    A study was done to determine the helminth fauna of the Red-winged Blackbird, Agelaius phoeniceus, and the Common Grackle, Quiscalus quiscula, from northwestern Ohio. Thirty adult Redwings and 19 adult Grackles were examined. Plagiorchis nobeli and Anonchotaenia quiscali were found in Redwings, the later species for the first time. Echinostoma revolutum, Porrocaecum ensicaudatum, Syngamus trachea, and Capillaria ovopunctata were recovered from Grackles. Conspicuum icteridorum, Dispharynx pipilonis, and Prosthorhynchus formosus were recovered from both hosts. Several new host records are reported.
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    The Changing Distribution of the Genus Najas (Najadaceae) in Ohio
    (1971-09) Wentz, W. Alan; Stuckey, Ronald L.
    Over the past 70 years, the distributions of the species in the genus Najas in Ohio have undergone changes. Najas gracillima and N. flexilis, native species of northern, cool, clear waters, have disappeared or become reduced in abundance, while N. marina and N. minor, European species, and N. guadalupensis, a southern native species, have invaded, spread, and/or have become more common in the state. Factors apparently responsible for these changes are (1) an increase in the numbers of artificial ponds and lakes, (2) an increase in the turbidity of Ohio waters, and (3) a gradual warming and overall general eutrophication of Ohio river and lake waters. Dated dot-distribution maps show the Ohio distributions of these species. Notes on the distribution of the species in nearby states are given.
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    Book Review
    (1971-09)
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    The Position and Age of the Sciotoville Bar Locality, Southern Ohio
    (1971-09) Manger, Walter L.
    The Sciotoville Bar was a rock ledge exposed along the northeast bank of the Ohio River between the Little Scioto River and Wolfred Run (NE 1/4, sec. 8, T2N, R20W, Scioto County, Ohio). This well-known fossil locality yielded an abundant fauna from concretions in a shale which formed a portion of the ledge. Since 1920, however, the locality has been flooded by the pool created first from construction of Lock and Dam 31, and later by the Captain Anthony Meldahl Locks and Dam. Information assembled from various sources indicates that the main concretionary horizon represents the upper portion of the Portsmouth Member of the Cuyahoga Formation. In addition, a previously unpublished measured section of this locality by Hyde is now available which describes the location of the concretionary fossil-bearing horizon. The combined ammonoid fauna from the upper Cuyahoga and the overlying lower Logan Formation suggests a Kinderhookian rather than Osagean age for the concretionary horizon.
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    Hibernating Ichneumonidae of Ohio (Hymenoptera)
    (1971-09) Dasch, Clement E.
    Hibernation of the adult insect occurs infrequently in the Hymenoptera. Thirtynine species of parasitoid Ichneumonidae, representing thirteen genera and three subfamilies, were collected as hibernating adults in Ohio. Of 5,275 hibernating specimens examined, all but one were female. Hibernating specimens were collected from mid-October to mid-April, 1965-1970. Deep ravines, north-facing slopes, and low-lying ground where humidity and temperature fluctuations are minimal represented the most favored hibernation locations. Six types of hibernacula were examined, with sites beneath the loose bark of fallen trees favored by the most species and the largest numbers of specimens. Tables summarizing the distributional and ecological data and a key to the hibernating species are provided.
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    Book Review
    (1971-09)
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    Water Pollution by Oil-Field Brines and Related Industrial Wastes in Ohio
    (1971-09) Pettyjohn, Wayne A.
    Contamination of surface- and ground-water resources, owing to the disposal of oilfield brines and other industrial high-chloride waste waters, has long been a major problem in many areas in Ohio. A major cause of pollution is the use of brine "evaporation" pits. Although the chloride content in many contaminated areas has decreased with time by several orders of magnitude due to natural cleansing, concentrations in other areas have increased. The time at which a contaminated area will return to its original condition can not be accurately determined, because natural flushing depends on several hydrogeologic factors as well as the amount and rate of infiltration of rain.
  • Item
    Front Matter
    (1971-09)