Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 84, Issue 3 (June, 1984)

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Front Matter
pp. 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (652KB)

Occupational Differentiation and Change in an Ohio Amish Settlement
Foster, T. W. pp. 74-81
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (635KB)

(E, Z)-2, 6-nonadien-1-al and (E)-2-nonen-1-al Present in Crushed Cucumbers are Natural Repellents for the American Cockroach (Periplaneta Americana)
Scriven, R.; Meloan, C. E. pp. 82-85
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (251KB)

Determining the Active Component in 1, 3, 3-trimethyl-2-oxabicyclo {2, 2, 2} Octane (Cineole) that Repels the American Cockroach, Periplaneta Americana
Scriven, R.; Meloan, C. E. pp. 85-88
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (276KB)

A Markovian Analysis of Ethnic Transition: St. Clair Neighborhood in Cleveland, Ohio
Pavlakovic, Vera K.; Janson, Richard W. pp. 88-94
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (497KB)

Geochemical Study of Lake Erie Water near Cleveland, Ohio
Lo, Howard H. pp. 94-98
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (344KB)

Reproducibility of Biovolumetric Parameters in Community Reconstruction
Wiedman, L. A. pp. 98-102
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (640KB)

Summer Plankton Dynamics in Acton Lake, Ohio
Lewis, Michael A. pp. 103-112
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (624KB)

The Aquatic Insect Community in Penitentiary Glen, a Portage Escarpment Stream in Northeastern Ohio
Robertson, D. J. pp. 113-119
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (900KB)

An Illustrated Key to the Ohio Cambarus and Fallicambarus (Decapoda: Cambaridae) with Comments and a New Subspecies Record
Jezerinac, Raymond F.; Thoma, Roger F. pp. 120-125
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (426KB)

Is Betula Papyrifera Marshall Indigenous to Ohio
Cusick, Allison W. pp. 125-128
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (347KB)

Additions to the Vascular Plant Type Collection of the Ohio State University Herbarium
Furlow, J. J.; Lammers, T. G. pp. 129-132
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (315KB)

Mine Roof Condition and the Occurrence of Roof Falls in Coal Mines
Smith, A. D. pp. 133-138
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (829KB)

Brief Note: Location of Coal Mine Roof Falls and Associated mining Operations During Failure
Smith, A. D. pp. 139-141
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (177KB)

Brief Note: Two New Ohio Records of Trichoptera: Rhyacophilia Ledra Ross and Phryganea Cinerea Walker
Miller, M. W.; Huryn, A.; Klarer, D. M. pp. 141-142
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Book Reviews
pp. 142-143
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Back Matter
pp. 999
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (770KB)

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  • Item
    Back Matter
    (1984-06)
  • Item
    Book Reviews
    (1984-06)
  • Item
    Mine Roof Condition and the Occurrence of Roof Falls in Coal Mines
    (1984-06) Smith, A. D.
    Mine roof fall characteristics of 250 falls in 5 different room-and-pillar coal mines, located in Pike, Martin, and Floyd counties, Kentucky, were investigated to determine the relationship of selected parameters associated with roof failure and the assumed condition of the mine roof before failure. The selected parameters used in the study included: presence of cracks and water before the occurrence of fall, sloughing of coal ribs, floor heave condition, type of roof support (resin or mechanical anchor bolts), distance to coal face, and time of occurrence of fall after initial coal extraction. In addition, 8 research hypotheses, utilizing multiple linear regression techniques, were generated to test the relationship among the selected parameters and mine roof condition.
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    Additions to the Vascular Plant Type Collection of the Ohio State University Herbarium
    (1984-06) Furlow, J. J.; Lammers, T. G.
    Fifty-three type specimens of vascular plants are reported as additions to the type collection of The Ohio State University Herbarium, bringing the total number to 276. These include both recent acquisitions and newly recognized type material already in the collection. For each specimen, the name of the taxon, collection data, kind of type specimen, and source are provided.
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    Is Betula Papyrifera Marshall Indigenous to Ohio
    (1984-06) Cusick, Allison W.
    Betula papyrifera Marshall (Betulaceae) frequently is included in the indigenous Ohio flora. This status is based upon collections from a single tree in Lucas Co., Ohio, in 1934. Betula alleghaniensis Britton was collected from the same site at the same time. Neither of these species had been collected earlier in this section of Ohio, and neither has been observed since in the area. Both species are isolated from the main portions of their total range. The true status of Betula papyrifera in Ohio may never be known conclusively, but the native origin of the single Ohio tree is at best dubious.
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    An Illustrated Key to the Ohio Cambarus and Fallicambarus (Decapoda: Cambaridae) with Comments and a New Subspecies Record
    (1984-06) Jezerinac, Raymond F.; Thoma, Roger F.
    An illustrated taxonomic key is presented using structures of the chela and carapace to identify the 4 species and 2 subspecies of Cambarus, and one species of Fallicambarus known to occur in Ohio. Those forms broadly distributed throughout the state are C. (Lacunicambarus) diogenes diogenes Girard, a primary or secondary burrower; and C. (Cambarus) bartonii cavatus Hay, a secondary or tertiary burrower; the latter crayfish has not been previously recorded from the state. Species with restricted distributions are C. (C.) ortmanni Williamson, a primary or secondary burrower confined to the Ordovician region of southwestern Ohio; C. (C.) sciotensis Rhoades, a stream dweller occurring in the Scioto River, Little Scioto River, and tributaries of the Ohio River in Scioto and Lawrence counties; C. (C.) b, carinirostris Hay, a secondary or tertiary burrower frequenting streams of the Flushing Escarpment, Mahoning River, and Grand River drainages in eastern and northeastern Ohio; C. (Puncticambarus) robustus Girard, a stream inhabitant occupying primarily tributaries to Lake Erie and central and northern tributaries to the Ohio River, and F. (Creaserinus) fodiens (Cottle), a primary burrower occurring chiefly in the glaciated regions of northern Ohio. Species with broad distributions generally have a larger number of species as associates than those with restricted distributions.
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    The Aquatic Insect Community in Penitentiary Glen, a Portage Escarpment Stream in Northeastern Ohio
    (1984-06) Robertson, D. J.
    The aquatic insects inhabiting Penitentiary Glen, an isolated, highgradient lotic habitat along Stoney Brook in Lake County, Ohio, were sampled during winter (December 1976), spring (May 1977), and summer (July 1977) months. Collections of immatures from dip nets and Surber samples were augmented with adult specimens taken in sweep nets and hand-picked from streamside rocks. Seventy-three species distributed among 60 genera in 7 orders were collected. Based on the diverse composition of the community dominated by organisms intolerant of organic enrichment, water quality in Stoney Brook is not significantly degraded. Community composition varies seasonally, with a trend toward a declining proportion of facultative organisms and increasing proportions of saproxenous and saprophobic organisms from winter through spring and into summer. Benthic diversity in Penitentiary Glen compares favorably with that in similar, relatively undisturbed northeastern Ohio streams, but the identity and proportional distribution of aquatic taxa varies considerably between streams.
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    Summer Plankton Dynamics in Acton Lake, Ohio
    (1984-06) Lewis, Michael A.
    Plankton was quantitatively sampled from Acton Lake during July-September 1982. Eighty-two species of phytoplankton and 18 species of zooplankton were identified. Species of Cyanophyta dominated the phytoplankton, and overall the most abundant species during the study was the blue-green alga Schizothrix calckola. Rotifers dominated the zooplankton. The diversity index, species number and density of phytoplankton progressively increased whereas the same parameters for zooplankton were highest in August. Midday photosynthesis (carbon assimilation) ranged from an average of 20.7 mgC/m3/h in October to 100.4 mgC/m3/h during June.
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    Reproducibility of Biovolumetric Parameters in Community Reconstruction
    (1984-06) Wiedman, L. A.
    Criticisms have been raised about the inadequacies of methods in community paleoecological analysis. Until recently, most paleoecological studies were done by specialists in individual taxonomic groups. Because of this specialization, most data collected favored certain groups. Other fossils were either ignored, discounted, or loosely labelled qualitatively under descriptive terms as: rare, occasional or abundantly present. Ausich (1981) and Boucot (1981) have independently proposed methods of community analysis whereby the biovolume (shelly biomass) of all taxa present are quantified. To date, little has been done to substantiate the reproducibility of data obtained in this manner for level, soft-bottom, Paleozoic communities. A level, soft-bottom, Middle Devonian community is analyzed here using the sampling model proposed by Ausich (1981). Trends in the comparisons of biovolume to minimum number counts are shown to be reproducible as are trends in each of these catagories within individual horizontally continuous beds. Informational loss and quantitative reproducibility for this new method is shown to be an improvement over prior methodology.
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    Geochemical Study of Lake Erie Water near Cleveland, Ohio
    (1984-06) Lo, Howard H.
    In August 1981, 88 surface, intermediate-depth, and near-bottom water samples from 30 locations near Cleveland, Ohio, were collected from Lake Erie. The distribution of K, Na, Ca, and Mg with respect to water depth and location was investigated. Surface water generally had higher K, Na, Ca, and Mg contents than near-bottom water. Elemental concentrations increased sharply near the mouths of the Cuyahoga and Rocky Rivers, and these higher levels are probably the result of cultural inputs from residential and industrial wastes. The average concentrations of K, Na, Ca, and Mg were 1.5, 12.0, 38.2, and 9.6 ppm, respectively, in Lake Erie water far from the river mouths. These values are comparable with those reported for mid-lake water of Lake Erie but are considerably lower than values found for water near the mouths of the Cuyahoga and Rocky Rivers.
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    A Markovian Analysis of Ethnic Transition: St. Clair Neighborhood in Cleveland, Ohio
    (1984-06) Pavlakovic, Vera K.; Janson, Richard W.
    This paper suggests the use of Markovian chain analysis to utilize the data from the United States Census to predict the change of ethnic composition of an areal unit. A method for estimation of the transition matrix is proposed. Computations for the St. Clair neighborhood in Cleveland, Ohio, predict an actual increase in Yugoslavian occupance for the year 2000 when 52% of the neighborhood will probably consist of foreign European stock. This remarkable neighborhood, that has provided a gateway for South Slavs for more than a century, will probably continue as an entry point well into the 21st century.
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    Determining the Active Component in 1, 3, 3-trimethyl-2-oxabicyclo {2, 2, 2} Octane (Cineole) that Repels the American Cockroach, Periplaneta Americana
    (1984-06) Scriven, R.; Meloan, C. E.
    The compound l,3,3-trimethyl-2-oxabicyclo [2,2,2] octane, more commonly known as cineole or eucalyptol, present in bay leaves, is a natural repellent to the American cockroach, Periplaneta amerkana L. It was found that the isopropyl-oxygenisopropyl fragment of the compound is the smallest effective portion, and that the cyclohexane plus oxygen subgroup has the greatest effectiveness.
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    (E, Z)-2, 6-nonadien-1-al and (E)-2-nonen-1-al Present in Crushed Cucumbers are Natural Repellents for the American Cockroach (Periplaneta Americana)
    (1984-06) Scriven, R.; Meloan, C. E.
    The compounds (E, Z)-2,6-nonadien-l-al and (E)-2-nonen-l-al that are present in crushed cucumbers were found to repel 98% of American cockroaches, Periplaneta americana L., when present at concentrations of 50 ppm in a test chamber.
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    Occupational Differentiation and Change in an Ohio Amish Settlement
    (1984-06) Foster, T. W.
    Ohio Amish Directories (1973 and 1982) for the Geauga-Trumbull-Ashtabula county Ohio settlement were analyzed to determine the percentage of male employed household heads who were engaged in farming, non-farming traditional, and non-traditional occupations. In 1982, of 891 Amish household heads, 31% of the total were found to be farmers, 37% were employed in non-farming traditional occupations and 32% were involved in non-traditional types of employment, including factory work. Despite the atypically small percentage of farmers in the settlement, a comparison of data from the 1973 and 1982 directories revealed that factory work was not continuously displacing farming employment in the region. For instance, the number of Amishmen who listed farming as their primary occupation actually increased more during the above 9-year period than did the number of those who listed their occupation as factory worker. Based upon both directory and interview data, it was concluded that the Geauga area Amish had experienced a considerable degree of success in culturally adapting to a given level of factory employment. Futhermore, contrary to the theoretical expectations of some scholars, the movement of the Geauga Amish out of farming and into more diversified — and often more secular — types of occupations has not resulted in the destruction, or the radical transformation, of their traditional Amish values.
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    Front Matter
    (1984-06)