37th Hayes Advanced Research Forum (February, 2023)

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Submission Instructions for Students

Arts
1st place: Kim, Karen
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2nd place: Patel, Bhumi
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3rd place: Schofield, Amy
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Biological Sciences
1st place: Biltz, Rebecca
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2nd place: Li, Jin
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3rd place: Shannon, Brandon
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Business
1st place: do Rego Ferreira Lima, Mateus
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2nd place: Hughes, Molly

Education & Human Ecology
1st place: Nagpal, Manisha
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2nd place: Yang, Junyeong
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3rd place: Talley, Susan
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Engineering
1st place: Rice, Allyanna
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2nd place: Rima, Xilal
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3rd place: Jawdekar, Tanay
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FAES
1st place: Sommer, Abigail
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2nd place: Hu, Hetian
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3rd place: Hoffman, Samuel
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Health Sciences
1st place: McBride, Dillon
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2nd place: Brown, Fiona
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3rd place: Schuetz, Robert
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Humanities
1st place: Podraza, Morgan
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2nd place: Mazda, Andrea
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3rd place: Turpin, Chris
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Mathematical & Physical Sciences
1st place: Pollock, Emma
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2nd place: Feng, Shi
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Social & Behavioral Sciences
1st place: Inglehart, Ronald
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2nd place: Daly, Heather
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3rd place: Ross, Morgan
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Poster Division: Biological Sciences
1st place: Hedberg, Jack
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2nd place: Packer, Jonathan
3rd place: Davis, Amara

Poster Division: FAES
1st place: Do, Daniel
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2nd place: Sun, Zhining
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3rd place: Karuppuchamy, Veeramani
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Poster Division: Health Sciences
1st place: Shahid, Shifa
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2nd place: Rimmerman, Eleanor
3rd place: Gaudette, Kaylin

Poster Division: Humanities, and Education and Human Ecology
1st place: Lee, Sangeun
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2nd place: Pittman, Alexander
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3rd place: Mank, Lily

Poster Division: Social & Behavioral Sciences
1st place: Choi, Yong Min
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2nd place: Ryu, Ji Youn
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3rd place: Kim, Soh Hyeon
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Recent Submissions

Now showing 1 - 20 of 37
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    Contrapuntal Skills at the Beginner Levels
    (2023-02) Kim, Karen; Stanojevic, Vera
    The fugues of J.S. Bach have long been recognized as masterpieces essential to the classical piano repertoire. Some music historians, in fact, have gone so far as to call Bach's collections of preludes and fugues the "Old Testament" of piano literature. Bach's genius at composing counterpoint is what makes him outstanding from all other composers of the repertory. However, in the United States today, the general trend in piano education is to avoid teaching counterpoint and fugue until students reach an early advanced level. Even then, the learning of this genre is often superficial or at a minimum to satisfy pre-requisite requirements for applications and competitions. As for students who do not advance to such a level, their educational track usually does not allow opportunity to learn about Bach's contrapuntal music at all. The effect, unfortunately, is a hole in students' learning of contrapuntal music and a disservice to the quality of music appreciation at large. The purpose of this research is to address the disconnect between early keyboard education and contrapuntal music and to suggest a sequence of intermediary learning steps for piano students at elementary and intermediate levels. Music examined will include, but not be limited to, 2-part Inventions, 3-part Sinfonias, and pedagogical works by modern keyboard pedagogues. The following questions will be addressed: How can Bach's music be made accessible to students who have neither the mental ability to keep track of multiple voices, nor the technical abilities to perform them? What can be done to help students participate in and understand complex compositional processes? How can piano teachers re-order their instructional sequence to provide beginning students with a smoother gradation of growth and understanding of fugue and contrapuntal music? Preliminary trials with a sample of my students have shown that early exposure of fugues to young students led to increasing eagerness to engage with more contrapuntal music, and even children as young as six years old were able to successfully participate in activities based on finding fugal subjects. In formulating this research, inspiration was drawn from learning theories of Jeanne Bamberger and the classical education model, especially the grammar and formal logic stages of the trivium. An emphasis will be on developing the basic building blocks upon which later complexities of fugue develop, helping students to reflect on their hearings of contrapuntal music from the early stages, discussing the puzzles that emerge, and how early exposure to contrapuntal music may inform students' learnings of fugue later in the more advanced stages of development. Research consists of three stages. The initial stage of research involves working with the advisor to develop graded, age-appropriate levels of activities to help students build an understanding of counterpoint and fugue from an early stage. The secondary portion of this research is to apply these activities in the teaching setting to test the effectiveness of the activities in groups of students. The efficacy of the activities will be assessed by recording, collating, and analyzing student learning outcomes. Finally, results from the research will be compared to current trends in piano education and their implications on teaching methods, as well as recommendations for further study will be discussed.
  • Item
    The reading brain: characterize the distinctiveness and functional specificity of the visual word form area
    (2023-02) Li, Jin; Saygin, Zeynep
    The visual word form area (VWFA) is an experience-dependent region in the left ventral temporal cortex (VTC) that responds to written words and letters. However, after more than three decades of investigation, the nature and even the existence of this region is still under debate. Some studies suggest that the VWFA is not dedicated to visual words/not distinct from other VTC regions; others argue that the VWFA is not even visual and is instead part of the amodal language and/or attention networks. But without a clear definition of the VWFA and its VTC neighbors, and a without direct comparison of high-level visual, linguistic, or attentional neural responses in these regions, these debates still linger, preventing progress in the field. Here, we scanned 63 adults on: visual localizers to delineate subject-specific VTC category-selective fROIs; an auditory language localizer to assess linguistic processing within VTC vs. amodal/canonical frontotemporal language fROIs; and spatial working memory (SWM) task to assess attentional load-based responses. We found that only the VWFA shows a significantly greater response to visual words compared to all other high-level visual stimuli, auditory language conditions, and SWM conditions. Moreover, while the VWFA is unique within the VTC in showing word-selectivity, its selectivity to auditory language is on par with various other VTC fROIs. Further, any language selectivity within the VTC is dwarfed by visual selectivity even to non-preferred stimulus categories of the fROI, suggesting that the VTC is not part of the key language network. Additionally, all VTC fROIs, except RSC, were modulated by attention on the SWM task. Overall, we used precision fMRI with multiple tasks to thoroughly examine the response properties of the VWFA, finding that while it does show some linguistic and attentional sensitivities, it is clearly a visual region and distinct from adjacent VTC visual regions only in its neural preferences for orthography; it is also distinct from canonical language or dorsal attention networks, caring more about visual aspects of words than higher-level linguistic content. We propose that the role of the VWFA is more akin to a visual look-up dictionary of letters and words to facilitate perceptual processing, and that this percept is transferred to the canonical language network for high-level linguistic processing. We hope that the field can now move forward to addressing other interesting questions, including the origins and mechanisms of this region and more importantly, how human brains enable complex human cognition.
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    Prioritized Reanalysis of Genetic Rare Disease: A Pilot Study
    (2023-02) Schuetz, Robert; White, Peter
    Clinical exome and genome sequencing (ES/GS) have become primary diagnostic tools for patients suspected of rare genetic conditions. Despite the clinical implementation of ES/GS, a diagnostic genetic variant is identified in less than half of these patients. In theory, emerging information relating to an undiagnosed patient could be utilized in a secondary reanalysis to identify a diagnosis that could not previously be identified. Considering the reality of finite resources, a critical need exists to prioritize cases likely to yield a diagnosis if reanalyzed. To address this need, we introduce a computational decision-aid tool to score cases based on their diagnostic potential. Previous work has yielded CAVaLRi, an algorithm that contextualizes patients' clinical features and genetic variants to score variants that are likely to produce a diagnosis. After updating requisite knowledgebases, CAVaLRi diagnostic probabilities were obtained for every candidate diagnostic variant in undiagnosed cases suspected of harboring genetic disease. These CAVaLRi data were combined with case metadata to train an ensemble maline learning classifier, PARADIGM, to distinguish between diagnostic and non-diagnostic cases. Cases with diagnostic variants (n=236) were used as positive patterns in model training, while cases without diagnostic variants or variants of uncertain significance were used as negative patterns (n=175). The twenty highest-scoring PARADIGM cases were referred to an independent rare disease team for ES/GS reinterpretation. Eight of the twenty cases recommended for reanalysis yielded a diagnostic finding. This was three times more than expected, given previous reports of unprioritized reanalysis.
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    Teaching Cybersecurity in the Digital Rhetoric Classroom
    (2023-02) Turpin, Christoffer; Jones, John
    The way we do cybersecurity isn't working. Failure to attend to the human factors of cybersecurity is the cause. One human factor which has been critically ignored is cybersecurity education and training designed for the average, everyday user. The dominate approaches to this sort of education and training have been shown to be at best ineffective and at worst actively harmful. In this essay I describe how the field of digital rhetoric can be leveraged to design more effective programs and thus improve cybersecurity.
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    Imperial Insecurities in the Indochinese Colonial Press
    (2023-02) Mazda, Andrea; Conklin, Alice