Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 104, Issue 2 (April, 2004)

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Front Matter
pp. 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (46KB)

What is at Stake with High Stakes Testing? A Discussion of Issues and Research
Marchant, Gregory J. pp. 2-7
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (33KB)

Select Coleoptera of the Ravenna Training and Logistics Site, Ohio, 1999
Williams, Roger; Hartzler, Diane pp. 8-19
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (61KB)

Comparison of Standing Vegetation and Seed Bank Composition One Year Following Hardwood Reforestation in Southwestern Ohio
Leary, Cathlene I.; Howes-Keiffer, Carolyn pp. 20-28
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (142KB)

Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Communities from the Portage River Watershed Headwater Streams (Wood County, Ohio)
Rife, Gwynne S.; Moody, Dwight L. pp. 29-35
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (314KB)

Book Review
pp. 36
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (14KB)

Back Matter
pp. 999
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (308KB)

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    Back Matter
    (2004-04)
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    Book Review
    (2004-04) Forawi, Sufian A.
    Review of Palms Won't Grow Here and Other Myths by David A. Francko
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    Front Matter
    (2004-04)
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    Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Communities from the Portage River Watershed Headwater Streams (Wood County, Ohio)
    (2004-04) Rife, Gwynne S.; Moody, Dwight L.
    Macroinvertebrate communities in a transect of the Portage River watershed were quantitatively and qualitatively assessed. The emphasis was on identification and community structure of the macroinvertebrate biota resident in its smallest order streams and ditches. Hester-Dendy multi-plate samplers were used to assess the macroinvertebrate communities at 10 sites across the watershed in the summer of 2001. Dominant macroinvertebrates collected at greater than 70% of the sites were: Caenis sp., Stenonema femoratum, Lirceus lineatus, Physella integra 54 species from 11 major taxa were collected overall, with highest diversity in the smallest order tributaries. The central area of the transect yielded lower numbers of species and densities than the eastern or western drainage areas, and Shannon-Wiener Diversity Indices (SDI) illustrate this depressed community structure. Of the study sites, Rader Creek and the South Branch of the Portage were the most diverse, while Bull Creek was the least diverse. As was predicted from the physical appearance of the majority of the sites, the Portage River watershed macroinvertebrate communities were both depauperate and trophically simplistic. The Invertebrate Community Index (ICI is the principal assessment tool used by the Ohio EPA to monitor all free-flowing waters in Ohio) of the macroinvertebrate communities’ resident suggest only poor to fair water quality at all locations throughout the summer. The impoverished state of the communities present in what is the most active time of the year suggests that steps to increase the health and complexity of the habitat would offer greater natural services to the watershed and drainage.
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    Comparison of Standing Vegetation and Seed Bank Composition One Year Following Hardwood Reforestation in Southwestern Ohio
    (2004-04) Leary, Cathlene I.; Howes-Keiffer, Carolyn
    Successful conversion of pastures to forest is often hindered by the lack of structural complexity, which in turn reduces seed dispersal and recruitment of trees and shrubs. A long-term restoration study was initiated on a former pasture at the Fernald Environmental Management Project in southwestern Ohio. Our objective was to establish a planting design that has the potential to accelerate the restoration and succession of a site by creating structural complexity with uneven-aged stands of native trees. Changes in herbaceous vegetation composition were observed among the planting treatment by the end of the first growing season. We hypothesized that the vegetation differences could be attributed to recruitment from the seed bank following planting related disturbances. The standing vegetation and seed bank were evaluated to determine if differences in above-ground vegetation observed among plots could be explained by differences in composition of the seed bank. Using principle coordinates analysis (PCO), we found that herbaceous composition differed significantly (P <0.0001) from other planting treatments where high densities of saplings were planted, specifically due to a significant increase in perennial herbs (P <0.001). Based on cluster analysis, the seed bank and above-ground vegetation composition form two discrete groups, suggesting the seed bank does not fully account for standing vegetation. We attribute this compositional change to increased colonization via wind-dispersal and rhizome exposure of gaps created in the pasture grasses following planting disturbance. The results of this study suggest that disturbances related to restoration planting may dramatically alter the herbaceous vegetation composition of a site.
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    Select Coleoptera of the Ravenna Training and Logistics Site, Ohio, 1999
    (2004-04) Williams, Roger; Hartzler, Diane
    This is the first report of a three-year survey of the Coleoptera at the Ravenna Training and Logistics Site (RTLS) near Ravenna, OH. The goal of this study was to conduct a survey of the beetles at the RTLS in order to establish a benchmark of the species found at this site. This is the first study of its kind at the Training and Logistics Site. More than 11,000 specimens were collected during the activity period, April – November 1999. A total of 282 different species in 51 families were collected and identified. Collection methods included flight intercept traps, Lindgren® funnel traps, aerial traps, pit fall traps, aggregation pheromone traps, Japanese beetle traps, aquatic traps, beating sheets, UV light traps, hand collection, Berlese® funnels, and sweep nets. Several new state and regional records have been established.
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    What is at Stake with High Stakes Testing? A Discussion of Issues and Research
    (2004-04) Marchant, Gregory J.
    High stakes tests are defined as those tests that “carry serious consequences for students or educators.” The consequences from standardized achievement tests range from grade retention for school children to rewards or punitive measures for schools and school districts. The nature of standardized achievement tests used in these situations poses validity problems for the decisions. Numerous unintended negative consequences or students, teachers, curriculum, and schools have been identified. Research has yet to establish clear benefits from these high stakes practices. Therefore, with little empirical support and financial and human costs high, a costs/benefits analysis suggests that the high stakes testing bandwagon, further fueled by No Child Left Behind, needs to be carefully evaluated before it continues to roll.