Empirical Musicology Review: Volume 2, Number 3 (2007)

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Empirical Musicology Review Vol. 2, No. 3, 2007

Issue DOI: https://doi.org/10.18061/1811/81082

Facilitation and Coherence Between the Dynamic and Retrospective Perception of Segmentation in Computer-Generated Music
Bailes, Freya; Dean, Roger T. pp. 74-80
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Documenting Spoken and Sung Texts of the Dagaaba of West Africa
Bodomo, Adams; Mora, Manolete pp. 81-102
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Language Plots in Musical Spaces: A Response to Adams Bodomo and Manolete Mora
Avorgbedor, Daniel pp. 103-109
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Reply to "Embodied Rhythm" by Bruno Repp and "Do Preferred Beat Rate and Entrainment to the Beat Have a Common Origin in Movement?" by Laurel Trainor
Todd, Neil P. McAngus; Lee, Christopher S. pp. 110-112
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Review: McPherson, G.E. (Ed.) The Child as Musician: A Handbook
Russell, Joan pp. 113-118
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Announcements
Butler, David pp. 119-121
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    Announcements
    (Empirical Musicology Review, 2007-07) Butler, David
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    Review: McPherson, G.E. (Ed.) The Child as Musician: A Handbook
    (Empirical Musicology Review, 2007-07) Russell, Joan
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    Reply to "Embodied Rhythm" by Bruno Repp and "Do Preferred Beat Rate and Entrainment to the Beat Have a Common Origin in Movement?" by Laurel Trainor
    (Empirical Musicology Review, 2007-07) Todd, Neil P. McAngus; Lee, Christopher S.
    Two leading issues raised in commentaries on the authors’ earlier article (2007) involved the possible roles of gender differences and the vestibular system on test results. Those issues are discussed in this reply.
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    Language Plots in Musical Spaces: A Response to Adams Bodomo and Manolete Mora
    (Empirical Musicology Review, 2007-07) Avorgbedor, Daniel
    The commentary begins with by briefly reviewing UNESCO’s activities in the documentation, preservation, and dissemination of cultural traditions worldwide, and particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Suggestions are then made regarding how the observations reported by Bodomo & Mora (2007) might be augmented by various theoretical, musical, and ethnolinguistic perspectives. The commentary also addresses challenges of designing and conducting research regarding integrative performance events and the construction, communication, and interpretation of cultural meaning.
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    Facilitation and Coherence Between the Dynamic and Retrospective Perception of Segmentation in Computer-Generated Music
    (Empirical Musicology Review, 2007-07) Bailes, Freya; Dean, Roger T.
    We examined the impact of listening context (sound duration and prior presentation) on the human perception of segmentation in sequences of computer music. This research extends previous work by the authors (Bailes & Dean, 2005), which concluded that context-dependent effects such as the asymmetrical detection of an increase in timbre compared to a decrease of the same magnitude have a significant bearing on the cognition of sound structure. The current study replicated this effect, and demonstrated that listeners (N = 14) are coherent in their detection of segmentation between real-time and retrospective tasks. In addition, response lag was reduced from a first hearing to a second hearing, and following long (7 s) rather than short (1 or 3 s) segments. These findings point to the role of short-term memory in dynamic structural perception of computer music.
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    Documenting Spoken and Sung Texts of the Dagaaba of West Africa
    (Empirical Musicology Review, 2007-07) Bodomo, Adams; Mora, Manolete
    This article discusses a documentation of spoken texts, sung texts, and dances of the Dagaaba, a mainly oral West African cultural group based on actual interdisciplinary linguistic and musicological field research within the group. The importance of this documentation lies in the fact that traditional oral cultures are fast disappearing among some sections of such societies in the face of a ruthless process of globalization. The article outlines the socio-cultural organization of the communities investigated, gives a succinct description of the structure of Dagaare, language of the Dagaaba, and describes the structure of bawaa, their main dance, before analyzing transcriptions of a representative sample of spoken and sung folktales with comments on the thought systems and world-views emanating from these texts.