Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 67, Issue 6 (November, 1967)

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Front Matter
pp 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1109KB)

Biology of the Freshwater Drum in Western Lake Erie
Edsall, Thomas A. pp 321-340
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1288KB)

Book Review
pp 340-340
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (31KB)

Relationships of Lower Silurian Strata in Ohio, West Virginia, and Northern Kentucky
Horvath, Allan L. pp 341-359
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1526KB)

Gravity Survey of the Serpent Mound Area, Southern Ohio
Bull, C.; Corbato, C. E.; Zahn, J. C. pp 359-371
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (911KB)

Concern for the History of Science at Meetings of the Ohio Academy of Science, 1891-1966, with an Analysis of the Papers
Dexter, Ralph W. pp 372-378
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (546KB)

Anomalous Drainage Pattern and Crustal Tilting in Ottawa County and Vicinity, Ohio
Sparling, Dale R. pp 378-381
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (322KB)

Radio-Tracking a White-Tailed Deer
Balding, Terry A. pp 382-384
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (283KB)

Book Review
pp 384-386
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (249KB)

Index to Volume 67
pp 387-392
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Back Matter
pp 999
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    Back Matter
    (1967-11)
  • Item
    Index to Volume 67
    (1967-11)
  • Item
    Book Review
    (1967-11)
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    Radio-Tracking a White-Tailed Deer
    (1967-11) Balding, Terry A.
    A female deer (Odocoileus virginianus), which had been confined all six years of her life, was immobilized with Sernylan, fitted with a collar containing a radio transmitter, and released on a study area in west-central Illinois on March 8, 1963. Her movements and daily activity were monitored, using portable radio tracking equipment, until December, 1963. Early movements and activity were thought to be related to previous confinement, while later movements and activity were considered to be more normal.
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    Anomalous Drainage Pattern and Crustal Tilting in Ottawa County and Vicinity, Ohio
    (1967-11) Sparling, Dale R.
    Ottawa County, Ohio, is situated near the western end of Lake Erie on a flat glaciallake plain that is interrupted by bedrock highs only at the western and eastern ends of the county. The drainage pattern on the lake plain is anomalous in that the courses of the major streams do not trend directly down the present slope normal to its strike. The entire region has apparently experienced tilting down to the north about an axis trending approximately east-west, producing an increased gradient to the north and resulting in considerable stream piracy. The tilting involved differential movement on the order of 2.8 feet per mile and is believed to be related to isostatic adjustment during and following the last stages of Pleistocene glaciation.
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    Concern for the History of Science at Meetings of the Ohio Academy of Science, 1891-1966, with an Analysis of the Papers
    (1967-11) Dexter, Ralph W.
    By the 75th anniversary of The Ohio Academy of Science in 1966, a total of 116 papers had been read at annual meetings on the history of science. Measured by numbers of papers presented, botanists have shown the greatest interest and activity in the historical aspect, while zoologists have been second, with increasing concern by other scientists generally in recent years. With 16 papers presented at a Special Session for the History of Science in 1966, the grand total of 132 papers prepared by 99 authors, fall into 13 categories as follows: biographical studies; history of organizations and institutions; historical development of special fields of science; history of technology, medicine, Ohio natural resources, ethnic groups and social history, plant collections, science education, places of scientific interest, science literature, and scientific instruments; and the history of science in general.
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    Gravity Survey of the Serpent Mound Area, Southern Ohio
    (1967-11) Bull, C.; Corbato, C. E.; Zahn, J. C.
    Over most of south-central Ohio, the sedimentary Paleozoic rocks exposed at the surface are relatively flat-lying, but in the Serpent Mound area of Highland and Adams Counties they show a circular feature, four miles in diameter, in which the rocks are complexly faulted. This structure has not yet been satisfactorily explained; two of the hypotheses proposed to explain its origin are 1) that it was caused by a "cryptovolcanic" event and 2) that it is an "astrobleme," produced by the impact of a meteoritic body. These two possible mechanisms might be distinguished by the attendant differences in the density variations produced: the cryptovolcanic structure could be associated with large lateral variations in density at the level of the basement rocks, while the meteoritic impact could produce shatter zones and brecciated layers, and small reductions in density in the rock lying closer to the surface. A closely-spaced network of gravity stations extending beyond the limits of the surface expression of the ring structure shows no gravity anomaly pattern that can be related to the surface features. Supporters of the astrobleme hypothesis are more likely to find this evidence useful than are the cryptovolcanists.
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    Relationships of Lower Silurian Strata in Ohio, West Virginia, and Northern Kentucky
    (1967-11) Horvath, Allan L.
    The Brassfield Formation, consisting mainly of carbonate strata, is overlain by beds of the Dayton Formation at several localities in southwestern Ohio, high on the east flank of the Cincinnati Arch. The Brassfield thickens eastward into the subsurface and becomes separated from the Dayton by an expanding wedge of shale and carbonate beds. The writer considers these beds to be equivalent to the middle and lower parts of the Noland Formation of Kentucky. The northernmost outcrop of the Noland Formation occurs in Adams County in southern Ohio, but in the subsurface it can be traced farther north into Pike County and thence northeast to Guernsey County, Ohio. The lower Plum Creek Clay Member of the Noland continues into northern Ohio and Ontario, where it merges with the Cabot Head Shale. The Brassfield Formation can also be traced in the subsurface from the outcrop in Adams County northward into the Manitoulin Dolomite of Ontario. Eastward, the Brassfield and part of the overlying Plum Creek Clay Member (in southern Ohio and in Kentucky) or the Cabot Head Shale (farther north) intertongue with the "Clinton" sandstone in central and eastern Ohio and the equivalent Tuscarora Formation in eastern Kentucky and West Virginia. The upper members of the Noland (Oldham, Lulbegrud, and Dayton) and part of the lower member can be traced from southern Ohio into the lower part of the Rose Hill Formation where it occurs in the subsurface of western West Virginia. Although some geologists have failed to distinguish the different members of the Noland Formation from the Brassfield in subsurface studies, information from recent drill holes indicates that these can be traced from Kentucky into southern Ohio as separate stratigraphic units.
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    Book Review
    (1967-11)
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    Biology of the Freshwater Drum in Western Lake Erie
    (1967-11) Edsall, Thomas A.
    Information on the biology of the freshwater drum or sheepshead (Aplodinotus grunniens) was collected in Lake Erie during a fishery and limnological study made by the Bureau of Commerical Fisheries in 1957 and 1958. Growth of the sheepshead in 1958 was slower than in 1927, and slower than the growth in most other waters. Males and females grew at the same rate through the 4th year of life, but thereafter the females grew faster. Males required more than 13 years and females 11 years to reach 17 inches. A weight of 2 pounds was attained in the 12th year of life by males and in the 10th year by females. Annulus formation extended from mid-June to early August for age-groups I-IV (2nd through 5th year of life). Younger fish started growth earlier in the season than the older fish, and the larger, faster growing members of an age group began growth earlier than the smaller fish. The growing season in 1958 ended in early October. Bottom-water temperatures were about 65°F when growth started (mid-June) and 58°F when growth ended. Growth was most rapid in August when temperatures were highest for the year (72 °F). Growth of young of the year, but not that of older fish, was positively correlated with temperature during the 1951-57 growing seasons. The sex ratio of the 1958 samples shifted with age; age-groups I-IV contained 54% males, but older age groups had 75% males. Males matured between 7.0 and 15.9 inches (age-groups II-V) and females between 9.0 and 13.4 inches (age-groups III-VII). Spawning in 1958 reached a peak in early July, but extended from mid-June to early August.
  • Item
    Front Matter
    (1967-11)