Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 97, Issue 1 (March, 1997)

Permanent URI for this collection

Front Matter
pp. 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (457KB)

Adventitious Root Production and Survival of Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) Shoot Sections
Brown, Beverly J.; Wickstrom, Conrad E. pp. 2-4
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (914KB)

Forest Decline and Tree Mortality in a Southeastern Ohio Oak-Hickory Forest
Walters, Gretchen M.; McCarthy, Brian C. pp. 5-9
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1831KB)

Long-Term Hypothyroidism and Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) Response in Adult Mice
Meserve, Lee A.; Russ, Edmond V. pp. 10-13
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (466KB)

The Summer Bird Community in a Late-Successional Beech-Maple Forest in Ohio
Horn, David Joseph; Benninger-Truax, Mary pp. 14-16
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (319KB)

Airborne Radon in Homes in Summit County, Ohio: A Geographic Analysis
Harnapp, Vern R.; Dollwet, H. A.; Rong, Shiying pp. 17-23
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (577KB)

Aquifer Tests in Carbonate Rocks Overlain by Glacial Sediments in North-Central Ohio
Raymondi, Richard R. pp. 24-29
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (557KB)

Book Reviews
Gutierrez, Andrew Paul pp. 30-30
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (346KB)

Back Matter
pp. 999
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (490KB)

Browse

Recent Submissions

Now showing 1 - 9 of 9
  • Item
    Back Matter
    (1997-03)
  • Item
    Book Reviews
    (1997-03) Gutierrez, Andrew Paul
  • Item
    Aquifer Tests in Carbonate Rocks Overlain by Glacial Sediments in North-Central Ohio
    (1997-03) Raymondi, Richard R.
    The upper 25 to 30 meters (m) of the carbonate-rock aquifer system in north-central Ohio was tested at three sites in 1987 to determine the feasibility of constructing the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The aquifer system consists of a sequence of Silurian dolomites and Devonian limestones which is generally overlain by glacial deposits. Although the bedrock units have been separated in terms of age and lithologic characteristics, they function as a common hydrologic unit. Values of transmissivity and the coefficient of storage range from 15 to 745 mVday, and 1.8 X 105 to 9.8 X 10 4, respectively. Water-bearing zones above and below the depth of production in test wells responded to pumping, but the vertical communication was usually not as well developed as horizontal communication. In one test, nested wells completed separately in the bedrock and glacial sediments indicated that the two systems behaved as a single hydrologic unit. Fracture systems in the carbonate-rock aquifer were detected beneath greater than six m of glacial deposits by close inspection of low-level black-and-white infrared aerial photographs. Observation wells located on the fracture systems indicated relatively higher directional transmissivities. The results of the investigation indicated that ground water would have been a factor during construction of the SSC facility. Dewatering and depressurization wells, grouting, and sumps would have been required to control inflows from the aquifer system.
  • Item
    Airborne Radon in Homes in Summit County, Ohio: A Geographic Analysis
    (1997-03) Harnapp, Vern R.; Dollwet, H. A.; Rong, Shiying
    The purpose of this study was to: 1) create a GIS data base with 546 radon readings from mainly single-family homes in Summit County, OH; and 2) to describe the geographic pattern of indoor radon in the county. The average radon level was 4.01 pCi/L, just at the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) recommended action level. Thirty-two percent of the homes in the county exceeded that level. Geologic factors that influence indoor radon concentrations are areas where the Ohio shale and soils combined with high uranium content underlie the surface. Soils with high permeabilities also yield high radon levels. Positive correlations exist, albeit not all are statistically significant, between radon activity and air temperature, soil permeability, surface uranium concentration, and proximity to underground mines. A negative correlation was found to exist between radon reading and barometric pressure. Houses with basements also have higher radon readings than those built on slabs. No significant difference was found in seasonal indoor-radon concentrations.
  • Item
    The Summer Bird Community in a Late-Successional Beech-Maple Forest in Ohio
    (1997-03) Horn, David Joseph; Benninger-Truax, Mary
    We studied the summer bird community in an unfragmented, late-successional, 61 ha beechmaple forest at the James H. Barrow Field Station in Portage County, Ohio. Birds were surveyed by making 30 counts along either of two trails in June and July of 1992, and recording all individuals seen or heard. During the survey period, we made 958 observations of 29 species. The five most common species, acadian flycatcher (Empidonax virescens), wood thrush (Hylocichia mustelina), red-eyed vireo (yireo olivaceus), hooded warbler (Wilsonia citrina), and northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis') accounted for over 50% of the observations made. Of the 15 Neotropical migrants found, seven have experienced population declines in the eastern United States between 1978 and 1987, and eight are considered to be area-sensitive. The beech-maple forest we surveyed is likely to be a regionally important natural area, for it provides breeding habitat for many declining and area-sensitive bird species that would not be consistently present in smaller, more disturbed forests.
  • Item
    Long-Term Hypothyroidism and Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) Response in Adult Mice
    (1997-03) Meserve, Lee A.; Russ, Edmond V.
    Previous studies of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in young rodents have found thiouracil-induced hypothyroidism to delay development of the axis past a relative stress non-responsive period. Little attention has been paid to the effects of long-term hypothyroidism on the function of this axis. The present study examined HPA axis response to an acute stress as determined by production of the glucocorticoid corticosterone, in mice made hypothyroid by thouracil exposure from conception to adulthood. The effect of injecting thyroxine (T4) or triiodothyronine (T3) on HPA response in these animals was also determined. Long-term hypothyroidism resulted in depressed body weight, subnormal levels of circulating T4, and elevated levels of T3. However, HPA axis response to an acute stress was normal in hypothyroid mice, and was not augmented by T4 injection for two weeks. On the other hand, two weeks of T3 injection allowed for a 70% increase in stress response as compared to either euthyroid or hypothyroid animals. The basis of the differential effect of the two thyroid hormones on stress response in hypothyroid mice remains to be determined.
  • Item
    Forest Decline and Tree Mortality in a Southeastern Ohio Oak-Hickory Forest
    (1997-03) Walters, Gretchen M.; McCarthy, Brian C.
    Many forests throughout the central Appalachians have been suspected, or observed, to be in declining health. Few studies have examined the vitality of southeastern Ohio's forests. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the health of a representative southeastern Ohio oak-hickory forest. Thirty-two 0.1 ha plots were sampled in August 1995 on the 550 ha Waterloo Wildlife Experiment Station (ODNR) in Athens County, OH. Data were collected for all living and dead stems with a DBH >10 cm (1,891 stems sampled). For living trees, a decline index (DI) was determined to evaluate the percentage of branch dieback, undersized leaves, and chlorosis. Dead trees were identified and categorized by mortality class (log vs. snag). Quercus spp. and Carya spp. accounted for 68% of all stems sampled (83% living). Among the live trees, only three species (Juglans nigra, Sassafras albidum, and Cornus florida) exhibited nonhealthy DI values. All other species were observed to be healthy or exhibiting only trace symptoms of decline. In contrast to decline, high mortality was observed for S. albidum (29.1%), Liriodendron tulipifera (21.7%), and Prunus serotina (21.6%). Quercus spp. (17.0%), and Carya spp. (16.2%) exhibited moderate mortality. Acer spp. had the highest vitality among the dominant species. Most of the observed patterns can be explained by successional dynamics and known pathogenic processes. Various incongruities emphasize the need for long-term studies of forest dynamics and forest health monitoring.
  • Item
    Adventitious Root Production and Survival of Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) Shoot Sections
    (1997-03) Brown, Beverly J.; Wickstrom, Conrad E.
    Purple loosestrife, Lythrum salicaria, notorious for successful wetland invasions, is a target of control measures including methods which produce shoot fragments. We document rejuvenation of purple loosestrife shoot sections and discuss the potential for vegetative reproduction through these fragments. Cut shoots (5, 10, and 15 cm long) were maintained in a greenhouse for four weeks. Approximately 80% of the shoots survived with production of adventitious roots and lateral shoots. Quantitative production of root biomass and lateral shoots was dependent on shoot length. Survival was not dependent on shoot length. Survival was greater among plants from drier habitats (100%) than from wetter soils (53%) and could not be predicted by pigmentation changes or necrosis. From a management perspective, fragment removal must follow mechanical eradication attempts in order to eliminate these vegetative propagules and prevent incidental recolonization.
  • Item
    Front Matter
    (1997-03)