Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 70, Issue 6 (November, 1970)

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Front Matter
pp 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1135KB)

A Comparative Study of Regional Planning in Britain and the Netherlands
Dutt, Ashok K. pp 321-335
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (2528KB)

Aspidobothrean Trematodes from Ohio Mussels
Stromberg, Paul C. pp 335-341
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Florence Valley : An Abandoned Stream Valley, Florence Township, Erie County, Ohio
Hole, Thornton J. F.; Redmond, Charles E. pp 341-346
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (408KB)

The Lythraceae of Ohio
Blackwell, Will H., Jr. pp 346-352
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (631KB)

Statistical Analysis of Ohio Fluted Points
McKenzie, Douglas H. pp 352-364
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1159KB)

Book Review
pp 364-364
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Genetics of an L2 Venation Mutant in Drosophila Melanogaster : II. Pattern Effects
Carlson, James H. pp 365-371
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Chemical Carcinogenesis : Syntheses of 2,7-Bis- (Acetamido) Fluorenes with Increased Molecular Thickness by 9-Substitution
Fishel, D. L.; Kletecka, G.; Muralidhara, R. pp 371-378
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Book Reviews
pp 378-381
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Index to Volume 70
pp 381-384
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Back Matter
pp 999
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    Back Matter
    (1970-11)
  • Item
    Index to Volume 70
    (1970-11)
  • Item
    Book Reviews
    (1970-11)
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    Chemical Carcinogenesis : Syntheses of 2,7-Bis- (Acetamido) Fluorenes with Increased Molecular Thickness by 9-Substitution
    (1970-11) Fishel, D. L.; Kletecka, G.; Muralidhara, R.
    The series: 9-methyl, 9-isopropyl, 9-cyclohexyl, 9,9-dimethyl, 9,9-diethyl, and the unsubstituted parent 2,7-bis (acetamido) fluorene were synthesized from the corresponding 9-substituted fluorenes. The two routes employed consisted of either (1) dinitration, reduction to the diamine, and diacetylation, or (2) Friedel-Crafts diacylation, then rearrangement via the Schmidt reaction. This provides a series of compounds of use in comparing relative carcinogenicity with changes in chemical reactivity as a function of increased steric hindrance due to altered molecular "thickness."
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    Genetics of an L2 Venation Mutant in Drosophila Melanogaster : II. Pattern Effects
    (1970-11) Carlson, James H.
    Pattern effects of the mutant L2 vein in Drosophila melanogaster were analyzed at 18°, 26° and 30°C. Pattern profiles were made by dividing the vein into 20 equal intervals. These intervals were classified as to the presence or absence of vein material. The most frequent interruptions were found in the basal region of the vein. The vein interval 3, lying between 10 to 15 percent of the distance from the proximal end, was found to be the most sensitive region. This interval showed the highest frequency of interruption (in more than 50 percent of the flies), regardless of the temperature variable. The distal region was much more stable. Differential pattern responses were found associated with changes in temperature and in sex. A general pattern characteristic of the mutant stock was noted at all three experimental temperatures.
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    Book Review
    (1970-11)
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    Statistical Analysis of Ohio Fluted Points
    (1970-11) McKenzie, Douglas H.
    Fluted points are important as a marker of the Big Game Hunting Tradition in North America. A sample of 772 fluted points from Ohio is analyzed here; means, standard deviations, medians, and ranges of some measurements of these points are presented for six previously defined types: Convex-Parallel-Sided, Concavo-Convex-Sided, Ross County, Triangular, Pentagonal, and Holcombe. The following measurements are used to define the points: maximum length, maximum width, distance of position of maximum width from base, basal width, maximum thickness, distance of position of maximum thickness from base, depth of basal concavity, maximum length of fluting, and length of lateral grinding. In addition, the following discrete attributes were recorded: number of flutes, presence or absence of basal grinding, flint type, and provenience by physiographic region of the state. Point types are distinct in regard to most quantitative attributes, with the exception of Convex-Parallel-Sided and Concavo-Convex-Sided. A cluster analysis of all possible correlations of quantitative variables was performed in order to isolate functional clusters from which principles of technique of manufacture might be inferred. There are three such clusters, or, presumably, principles of technique: (1) general size, (2), length-linearity, (3) fluting. For the discrete attributes, tests of association indicate that a fourth factor, edge and basal grinding (possibly to be interpreted as "degree of completion"), is present. By inference, the manufacturing process has four steps: determination of general size of artifact, shaping to proper length and width, thinning by fluting, and finishing by grinding. However, strength of clusters is only moderate, and there is both overlap of clusters and interdependence of attributes. Flint type and provenience vary independently of other attributes.
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    The Lythraceae of Ohio
    (1970-11) Blackwell, Will H., Jr.
    The distribution of Ohio representatives of the family Lythraceae was studied by examination of all specimens of this family in ten in-state and one out-of-state herbaria. Six species of the Lythraceae were found to be native to Ohio and are discussed herein: Decodon verticillatus, Rotala ramosior, Ammannia coccinea, Peplis diandra, Lythrum dacotanum, and Cuphea viscosissima. Three introduced taxa are also deemed worthy of inclusion: Lythrum hyssopifolia, L. salicaria, and Lagerstroemia indica. Lythrum hyssopifolia and Peplis diandra are rare in Ohio, each being known but from a single locality. Rotala ramosior and Ammannia coccinea are infrequent, the southern part of their Ohio distribution being directly related to the path of the Ohio and/or Scioto rivers. Though infrequent at present, Lythrum salicaria is spreading and is now locally abundant at several stations. Decodon verticillatus is rated in this treatment as frequent, but its distribution is scattered. It will certainly become less frequent if further destruction of its natural marsh habitat occurs. Lythrum dacotanum and Cuphea viscosissima are of common occurrence in the state. Lythrum dacotanum is broadly distributed in moist, low-lying, prairie situations; Cuphea viscosissima occurs in moist or dry habitats and is the only representative of the Lythraceae common in the Appalachian uplands of southeastern Ohio. County distribution maps are presented for all species included except Lagerstroemia indica (crape-myrtle), which is only occasionally planted as far north as Ohio.
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    Florence Valley : An Abandoned Stream Valley, Florence Township, Erie County, Ohio
    (1970-11) Hole, Thornton J. F.; Redmond, Charles E.
    An abandoned stream valley, here called Florence Valley, was found in eastern Erie County, Ohio. Florence Valley is about one mile long and connects the valleys of Chappel Creek and the Vermilion River. There is evidence that Florence Valley was formed as a result of the capture of a tributary of the Vermilion River by Chappel Creek. Chappel Creek, at the junction of Florence Valley and the valley of Chappel Creek, has a rightangled bend, which displays morphology characteristic of an "elbow-of-capture." The gradient of the eastern two-thirds of Florence Valley slopes toward the Vermilion River. Because the Vermilion River is more deeply entrenched than is Chappel Creek, this stream capture must have taken place at a time when the base level was at a higher elevation, when Chappel Creek had a shorter course and steeper gradient than did the Vermilion River. These conditions are believed to have existed during the time of Lake Maumee III.
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    Aspidobothrean Trematodes from Ohio Mussels
    (1970-11) Stromberg, Paul C.
    Three hundred and seventy-four mussels representing 37 species of the family Unionidae were collected from streams in the Ohio River and Lake Erie drainages in Ohio during 1966. Mussels were examined for aspidobothrean trematodes only. Two species, Aspidogaster conchicola von Baer, 1827, and Cotylaspis insignis Leidy, 1857, were recovered and are reported for the first time from Ohio. Aspidogaster was much more abundant than Cotylaspis. The difference in abundance is interpreted to be due to greater host specificity on the part of Cotylaspis in Ohio (a relationship that is apparently not universal).
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    A Comparative Study of Regional Planning in Britain and the Netherlands
    (1970-11) Dutt, Ashok K.
    Coordinated and comprehensive regional planning is the most-desired objective of any contemporary planner. Such an approach has been adopted both in the Netherlands and in Britain with varying emphasis, though these countries are among the world's pioneers in modern town and regional planning. Both countries have been greatly influenced by the Garden City concept of Howard. The themes of deconcentration, development of less-advanced areas, establishment of new towns, and location of industrial nuclei have been implemented in both countries as aspects of regional planning. Of the two, the Netherlands has achieved more success, as it has molded the above ideas to suit the requirements of the country, whereas Britain is implementing the themes more conservatively. The experiences of both countries in matters of regional planning are so revealing that they should help Americans to draw some conclusions which may have universal application.
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    Front Matter
    (1970-11)