Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 68, Issue 6 (November, 1968)

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Front Matter
pp 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1209KB)

Extinction of Mastodons in Eastern North America : Testing a New Climatic- Environmental Hypothesis
Dreimanis, A. pp 257-272
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Book Notices
pp 272-272
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (113KB)

Thirteen-Year Breeding History of a Chimney Swift
Dexter, Ralph W. pp 273-276
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (325KB)

Book Notice
pp 276-276
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (76KB)

Red-Winged Blackbird Nestling Growth Compared to Adult Size and Differential Development of Structures
Holcomb, Larry C.; Twiest, Gilbert pp 277-284
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Book Notice
pp 284-284
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (48KB)

A Simple, Rapid Method for the Multiple Assay of Tryptophan Pyrrolase in Drosophila
Morrison, William W.; Frajola, Walter J. pp 285-290
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (356KB)

Book Notice
pp 290-290
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (73KB)

Comments on Techniques Applicable to Determinations of Spatial Distribution on Intensity and Chromaticity
Urschel, Roberta L.; Gebel, Radames K. H. pp 291-303
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Book Notice
pp 303-303
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The Aromatic Nucleophilic Substitution Reaction : Possible Amine Catalysis in the Reaction of Tetrabutylammonium Hydroxide with 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzine
Reinheimer, John D.; Hostetler, Wayne pp 304-305
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The Postjuvenal Wing and Tail Molt of the Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa Umbellus Monticola) in Ohio
Davis, Jeffrey A. pp 305-312
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Checklist of Amphibians, Reptiles and Mammals of the Tree Farm Natural Area, Defiance County, Ohio
Ruffer, David G.; Leonard, Donald; Scherger, Gary pp 312-316
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Index to Volume 68
pp 316-320
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Back Matter
pp 999
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  • Item
    Back Matter
    (1968-11)
  • Item
    Index to Volume 68
    (1968-11)
  • Item
    Checklist of Amphibians, Reptiles and Mammals of the Tree Farm Natural Area, Defiance County, Ohio
    (1968-11) Ruffer, David G.; Leonard, Donald; Scherger, Gary
    The Natural Area known as the "Tree Farm" is a 78-acre Beech-Maple-White Oak forest in east-central Defiance County. Standard collection techniques revealed 6 species of amphibians, 7 reptiles, and 14 mammals present in the area, which, on the basis of work in the other, similar areas in the county, should be a fair approximation of the actual species composition of this area.
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    The Postjuvenal Wing and Tail Molt of the Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa Umbellus Monticola) in Ohio
    (1968-11) Davis, Jeffrey A.
    Because feather-replacement patterns influence the validity of aging criteria, 21 captive and 47 wild-trapped Ruffed Grouse from Ohio were studied to determine if their wing and tail molt is comparable to that of more northern races. The results indicate that juvenal primaries numbers 9 and 10 are retained during the first year, but that the progression of wing molt appears to be one to one and one-half weeks slower than that of New York birds. The tail molt occurs about four weeks later than that of New York grouse of comparable age. Differences were not detected in molt timing and pattern between wild and captive birds. Aging keys for chicks between 1 and 18 weeks are adjusted for the apparent slight geographical difference in wing molt rate. The peak hatching period in Ohio is May 15-28, approximately one and one-half weeks earlier than hatching dates reported for Wisconsin.
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    Book Notice
    (1968-11)
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    Comments on Techniques Applicable to Determinations of Spatial Distribution on Intensity and Chromaticity
    (1968-11) Urschel, Roberta L.; Gebel, Radames K. H.
    An instrumentation and method for analysing the spatial behaviour of optical properties of pertinent specimens is described, which performs opto-mechanical scanning with a multi-detector arrangement, uses special amplifiers for modification and a computer for signal evaluation, etc. The instrumentation is capable of identifying colors in the CIE color triangle and of making analyses of spectrographic plates possible by opto-electronic processing, which produces information too laborious to obtain otherwise or which cannot be perceived by direct visual examination of the spectrographic plates, especially if a stigmatic spectrograph has been used for the spectrographic plates.
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    Book Notice
    (1968-11)
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    A Simple, Rapid Method for the Multiple Assay of Tryptophan Pyrrolase in Drosophila
    (1968-11) Morrison, William W.; Frajola, Walter J.
    This report describes the development of a simple, rapid method for the kinetic assay of tryptophan pyrrolase in Drosophila. By means of this method, one can readily make simultaneous measurements of tryptophan pyrrolase activity in as many as 36 samples.
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    Book Notice
    (1968-11)
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    Red-Winged Blackbird Nestling Growth Compared to Adult Size and Differential Development of Structures
    (1968-11) Holcomb, Larry C.; Twiest, Gilbert
    Red-winged Blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) were studied at Toledo, Ohio, in an upland habitat in 1964 and 1965, and at Battle Creek, Michigan, in a marsh habitat in 1965. Nestlings were weighed and measured each day. In 1966 at Wooster, Ohio, adults were weighed and measured to obtain figures for comparison with nestling sizes at different stages in nest life. Mean weight of 18 neonates was 3.19 g, which was 7.5 percent of 18 adult female weights (41.6 g) and 79 percent of 18 fresh egg weights (4.02 g). Male nestlings showed higher values for mean weight and mean length of other body parts than females, but females reached a greater percent of adult size faster than males. All mean body weights and measurements increased in absolute size from hatching until day 10 except for gape width, which reached maximum size on day six and then decreased in width. The differential increase of size in different body parts shows a distinct correlation with their function while in the nest; those which were used during nest life developed in the first five days and those required after fledging developed in the last, five days. Rapid growth in weight occurred before rapid feather growth. Reduction in increases of weight each day is probably due to expenditure of more energy for feather growth and for maintenance of endothermy. The same phenomena are shown for many other species..
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    Book Notice
    (1968-11)
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    Thirteen-Year Breeding History of a Chimney Swift
    (1968-11) Dexter, Ralph W.
    The breeding history of a male Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica) has been traced in detail over a period of 13 years (1947-1959), which is the longest continuous record known for any individual of this species. During this time it resided or nested each year on the campus of Kent State University where it lived in air shafts with a group of four swifts for three years, and a group of three swifts for three years, as well as spending seven years living only with its mate. At one time or another it was mated to five different females and occupied four different air shafts in campus buildings during its life span.
  • Item
    Book Notices
    (1968-11)
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    Extinction of Mastodons in Eastern North America : Testing a New Climatic- Environmental Hypothesis
    (1968-11) Dreimanis, A.
    More than 600 late Wisconsin mastodon occurrences are known from the glaciated and periglacial portions of eastern North America. Most of of them have been found in poorly drained lowlands, swamps, and valleys, and on the continental shelf. Of the 28 radiocarbon-dated mastodon bones or associated wood from the entire area of eastern North America, 80 percent are 9,000-12,000 years old. Spruce forests or open woodlands have been indicated by palynologic investigations of 18 mastodon sites; wood or cones of spruce and trees associated with spruce forests have been found at ten sites. This evidence and the distribution pattern of mastodons near the northern boundary of the area of their occurrences suggest that the mastodons of eastern North America were associated with open spruce woodlands or spruce forests. Their extinction was probably initiated by the rapidly increasing dryness 10,000-11,000 years ago, which caused first the retreat of the spruce forests into the moister lowlands and finally their disappearance from the area occupied by mastodons. A migration of mastodons from the relict spruce enclaves toward the more northerly located spruce forests was hampered because these two areas were probably separated by a rapidly expanding belt of pine and hardwood forests over the better-drained morainic, kame, and dune areas in the Great Lakes Region.
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    Front Matter
    (1968-11)