Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 73, Issue 2 (March, 1973)

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Front Matter
pp. 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (668KB)

Personality as a Variable in the Behavior of Birds
Burtt, Harold E.; Giltz, Maurice L. pp. 65-82
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1221KB)

Some Backgrounds for an Ohio Mycobiota
Cooke, William Bridge pp. 83-88
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (492KB)

Back-Yard Fungi
Cooke, William Bridge pp. 88-96
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (607KB)

History of Wild-Turkey (Meleagris Gallop a Vo) Transplants in the Ohio Hill Country
Donohoe, Robert W.; McKibben, Charley E. pp. 96-102
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (453KB)

Seventy Years of Phycology at The Ohio State University
Taft, Clarence E. pp. 103-110
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (703KB)

Two New Species of Balocerus from Thailand and China (Homoptera: Cicadellidae)
Freytag, Paul H.; Morrison, William P. pp. 111-114
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (213KB)

A List of the Species of Polyamia (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) Known to Occur in Mexico, with Descriptions of New Species
DeLong, Dwight M.; Thambimuttu, Cuthbert pp. 115-125
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A New Genus, Desertana, and Two New Species of Chilean Leafhoppers Belonging to the Deltocephalinae (Homoptera: Cicadellidae)
DeLong, Dwight M.; Martinson, Candace pp. 125-127
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Book Reviews
pp. 128
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Back Matter
pp. 999
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    Back Matter
    (1973-03)
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    Book Reviews
    (1973-03)
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    A New Genus, Desertana, and Two New Species of Chilean Leafhoppers Belonging to the Deltocephalinae (Homoptera: Cicadellidae)
    (1973-03) DeLong, Dwight M.; Martinson, Candace
    The new genus Desertana and two new species, D. sicca n. sp. and D. arida n. sp., collected in Chile, are described.
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    A List of the Species of Polyamia (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) Known to Occur in Mexico, with Descriptions of New Species
    (1973-03) DeLong, Dwight M.; Thambimuttu, Cuthbert
    Seventeen species of Polyamia are treated, 16 of which are known to occur in Mexico. Seven previously described species, P. arachnion Kramer, P. gangamon Kramer, P. tolteca Kramer, P. delongi (Kramer), P. reticulata (Linnavuori), P. satur (Ball), and P. incerta Bcamer and Tuthill are listed and illustrated. Ten species, P. duella n. sp., P. acura n. sp., P. dualis n. sp., P. bradshawi n. sp., P. scina n. sp., P. randa n. sp., P. frustrara n. sp., P. triplehorni n. sp., P. nidula n. sp. and P. tulara n. sp. are described as new.
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    Two New Species of Balocerus from Thailand and China (Homoptera: Cicadellidae)
    (1973-03) Freytag, Paul H.; Morrison, William P.
    Two new species of Balocerus are described from the Oriental Region, B. orietitalis n. sp. from Thailand, and B. chinensis n. sp. from China.
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    Seventy Years of Phycology at The Ohio State University
    (1973-03) Taft, Clarence E.
    Phycology at The Ohio State University had its conception with a Proposed Algological Survey of Ohio by Professor William A. Kellerman in 1902. Seventy years of teaching and research in phycology, and the faculty who have contributed to the program since Professor Kellerman's proposal, are reviewed. This includes the chronological sequence of this development at The Ohio State University, from a Botany Department speciality to an interdisciplinary program. Masters and doctoral degrees granted in phycology are listed, as are the bibliographies that pertain to algae of the phycology faculty for the years from 1902 to 1972 inclusive.
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    History of Wild-Turkey (Meleagris Gallop a Vo) Transplants in the Ohio Hill Country
    (1973-03) Donohoe, Robert W.; McKibben, Charley E.
    Wild turkeys once inhabiting Ohio have been extinct since 1904. Between February 1950 and November 1971, therefore, a total of 397 wild-trapped turkeys was released on 16 forested sites in the Ohio Hill Country, 142 received from other states and 255 transplanted from other Ohio sites. Field investigations following these releases have documented the subsequent re-establishment of the wild turkey in the State. In 1972 significant turkey populations were known to exist in 92 townships in 17 counties (Jefferson, Monroe, Washington, Morgan, Perry, Hocking, Athens, Meigs, Vinton, Gallia, Jackson, Ross, Highland, Pike, Lawrence, Scioto and Adams).
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    Back-Yard Fungi
    (1973-03) Cooke, William Bridge
    For a number of years, while caring for flower beds, lawn, and shrubbery at his home, the writer has collected fruit bodies of those fungi which have been observed. The resulting list includes representatives of 138 species in most groups of fungi. While none of these is new to science, several records present interesting range extensions.
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    Some Backgrounds for an Ohio Mycobiota
    (1973-03) Cooke, William Bridge
    The fungi are eukaryotic, nonchlorophyllous, reducer organisms which occupy specific niches in all environments. They are integral parts of any ecosystem, natural or artificial, which may be delimited. Some groups have retained their necessity for an aquatic habitat. Others became adapted to terrestrial habitats as dead organic matter became available for them. Almost as soon as it was available, certain fungi developed enzyme systems for degrading highly complex products of producer plants, consumer animals, and reducer fungi. A cataglogue of Ohio fungi, which is greatly needed, is being developed from herbarium records, reports in the literature, and personal collections. Best examples of fungus populations are found in large undisturbed natural areas.
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    Personality as a Variable in the Behavior of Birds
    (1973-03) Burtt, Harold E.; Giltz, Maurice L.
    Investigations with Common Grackles, Red-winged Blackbirds, Brown-Headed Cowbirds, and Starlings indicate the importance of what is called personality in the interpretation of bird behavior. These studies were carried out in connection with a banding program at a decoy trap. An objective test of the characteristic called complacency reveals Cowbirds to be the most complacent and Starlings the most agitated. A rating scale for aggressiveness, based on the reaction of a bird in the hand to a standardized series of threatening gestures, reveals Grackles and Cowbirds to be the most aggressive and Starlings and Red-wings the least aggressive. Grackles have the greatest tendency to repeat, i.e., re-enter the trap. Recoveries of banded birds by other persons indicate that Grackles have the largest incidence of local recoveries, presumably due to topophilia. The Grackle population is much more stable (e.g. has more individuals remaining in area for 10 days or more) than are the populations of other species. A larger proportion of Grackles was trapped in a residential area and a smaller proportion in an agriculutral area. In a roost-control operation, more banded Grackles were collected than might be expected from the comparative sizes of the populations of the different species trapped at that time of year.
  • Item
    Front Matter
    (1973-03)