Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 95, Issue 3 (June, 1995)

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Front Matter
pp. 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (692KB)

Insects in the Killbuck Marsh Wildlife Area: 1993 Survey
Williams, Roger N.; Ellis, M. S.; Fickle, D. S. pp. 226-232
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (618KB)

New Dragonfly (Odonata) Species in Ohio, and Additions to County Records
Glotzhober, Robert C.; Restifo, Robert A.; Perry, T. Edward; Alrutz, Robert W. pp. 233-239
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (722KB)

Brief Note: Twenty-eight Species of Moths New to Ohio from Huffman Prairie, Greene County (Lepidoptera)
Metzler, Eric H.; Zebold, Roger A. pp. 240-242
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (318KB)

The Effect of Massed Versus Spaced Practice on Retention and Problem-Solving in High School Physics
Grote, Michael G. pp. 243-247
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (548KB)

The Determination of Radon Activities in Ground Water from Wisconsin Tills in Southwestern Ohio and Southeastern Indiana
Hair, Terry L., Jr.; Baldwin, A. Dwight, Jr. pp. 248-253
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (2726KB)

Diatom Communites in the Cuyahoga River (USA): Changes in Species Composition Between 1974 and 1992 Following Renovations in Wastewater Management
Brown, Beverly J.; Olive, John H. pp. 254-260
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (614KB)

Return and Increase in Abundance of Aquatic Flowering Plants in Put-In-Bay Harbor, Lake Erie, Ohio
Stuckey, Ronald L.; Moore, David L. pp. 261-266
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (528KB)

Book Reviews
Unger, Stephen H. pp. 267-267
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (491KB)

Reviewers of Manuscripts for the Ohio Journal of Science During 1994
pp. 271-271
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (66KB)

Back Matter
pp. 999
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (816KB)

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  • Item
    Back Matter
    (1995-06)
  • Item
    Book Reviews
    (1995-06) Unger, Stephen H.
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    Return and Increase in Abundance of Aquatic Flowering Plants in Put-In-Bay Harbor, Lake Erie, Ohio
    (1995-06) Stuckey, Ronald L.; Moore, David L.
    The initial survey of aquatic flowering plants in Put-in-Bay Harbor, South Bass Island, OH, by Pieters (1901), and a follow-up study by Stuckey (1971), documented an overall loss of 50% of the species, and 61% of the submersed species. In the past 25 years, and moreover in the past five years, dramatic new changes in the species composition have occurred in the flora: 1) nine species have returned or appeared for the first time, 2) fourteen species have continued to survive or have increased in abundance, and 3) five species have declined in overall abundance. The return of species requiring clear water for seed germination and growth and the reduction in abundance of species tolerant of turbid water may be related to the invasions and spread of Dreissena polymorpha (Zebra Mussel) and Dreissena bugensis (Quagga Mussel) which have resulted in increasing water clarity. Vallisneria americana continues to be the dominant submersed species of Put-in-Bay Harbor.
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    Diatom Communites in the Cuyahoga River (USA): Changes in Species Composition Between 1974 and 1992 Following Renovations in Wastewater Management
    (1995-06) Brown, Beverly J.; Olive, John H.
    Periphytic diatom communities along the Cuyahoga River were analyzed for possible changes in species composition resulting from improvements in wastewater management within the river basin during the past 18 years. The results, compared to a similar study conducted in 1974, and controlled for seasonality and microhabitat effects, show an increase in total diatom species (75 to 105), especially pollutionsensitive species, and a reduction in pollution-tolerant species—all indications of improved water quality. Reductions were evident in the number and proportion of pollution-tolerant species such as Gomphonema parvulum, Melosira varians, Navicula cryptocephala, N. pelliculosa, Nitzschia communis, N.palea, and Synedra ulna. The number and proportion of pollution-sensitive species such as Achnanthes linearis, Amphora pediculus, Cocconeis pediculus, Diatoma vulgare, Navicula tripunctata, and Nitzschia dissipata increased. Despite changes in species composition, headwaters of the river, managed as a domestic water supply and Ohio Scenic River, continue to support 2-3 X more taxa than the lower river below the City of Akron. Substantial degradation of water quality in the lower river persists despite recent restoration efforts. A major source of pollution occurs upstream from the Akron Water Pollution Control facility because sample sites above and below this facility were very similar in diatom species composition, each dominated by Nitzschia amphibia (-40%), a well known saprophilic diatom associated with organically polluted water. Overflows from combined stormwater-sanitary sewers, within the Akron metropolitan area are the most probable cause of the continued suppression of diatom species diversity.
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    The Determination of Radon Activities in Ground Water from Wisconsin Tills in Southwestern Ohio and Southeastern Indiana
    (1995-06) Hair, Terry L., Jr.; Baldwin, A. Dwight, Jr.
    Two hypotheses have been suggested by previous workers to explain the relatively elevated radon activities of ground water in certain areas of southwestern Ohio and southeastern Indiana. First, radon may be produced close to or at the Ordovician-Silurian unconformity by the concentration of uranium and radium on iron and manganese oxides and hydroxides and on clay minerals at this zone of weathering. Second, radon may be formed from the radioactive decay of radium which is concentrated on iron-oxides in zones of higher hydraulic conductivity in the lower carbonate section of the Silurian System. In both cases, it has been proposed that the elevated radon activities result from either the application of radium-bearing phosphate fertilizers or from the inclusion of radium-bearing fragments of Devonian black shale in the till.
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    The Effect of Massed Versus Spaced Practice on Retention and Problem-Solving in High School Physics
    (1995-06) Grote, Michael G.
    An analysis of the effects of massed versus spaced practice in the study of two topics in physics was performed. Three classes of physics students participated. Students were taught one of the topics followed by massed practice and the other topic followed by spaced practice. Two tests were administered two weeks after the final spaced practice to determine if there was a difference in retention or ability to solve new types of problems. Likert scales were administered to determine if interest in the subject matter was affected by the type of practice. In addition, interview data were collected to ascertain other variables which may have been overlooked. Statistically significant results favoring spaced practice were obtained for both the recall of subject matter (0.37) and the application of information to solve new kinds of problems (0.60). Interest was not significantly affected by the treatments. Interview data generally showed a preference for spaced practice.
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    Brief Note: Twenty-eight Species of Moths New to Ohio from Huffman Prairie, Greene County (Lepidoptera)
    (1995-06) Metzler, Eric H.; Zebold, Roger A.
    Huffman Prairie, a 109 acre Ohio registered Natural Landmark, was inventoried for Lepidoptera under agreement with The Nature Conservancy and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base from June 1992 through July 1994. As a result of this inventory, Pseudopostega cretea (Meyrick) (Opostegidae), Tinea carnarietta Clemens (Tineidae), Agonopterix pteleae Barnes & Busck (Oecophoridae), Cosmopterix dapifera Hodges, Cosmopterix montisella Chambers (Cosmopterigidae), Calosima melanostriatella (Dietz) (Blastobasidae), Coleophora texanella Chambers (Coleophoridae), Isophrictis rudbeckietta Bottimer, Bryotropha branella (Busck), Gnorimoschema busckiella Kearfott, Scrobipalpula henshawiella (Busck), Scrobipalpa atriplicella (F.v. Roslerstamm), Frumenta nundinella (Zeller), Syncopacma palpilineella (Chambers), Helcystogramma chambersella (Murtfeldt) (Gelechiidae), Acrolepiopsis leucoscia (Meyrick) (Acrolepiidae), Eucosma heathiana Kearfott, Epiblemma tandana (Kearfott), Dichrorampha sedatana (Busck), Aethes obliquana (Kearfott), Carolella sartana (Hiibner), Phalonia aurorana Kearfott, Thyraylia nana (Haworth), Trachysmia villana (Busck), Trachysmia cartwrightana (Kearfott) (Tortricidae), Hellula rogatalis (Hulst) (Crambidae), Phydtodes albatella reliquella (Dyar), and Peoria roseotinctella (Ragonot) (Pyralidae) were recorded from Ohio for the first time.
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    New Dragonfly (Odonata) Species in Ohio, and Additions to County Records
    (1995-06) Glotzhober, Robert C.; Restifo, Robert A.; Perry, T. Edward; Alrutz, Robert W.
    This report is a contribution to the Ohio Odonata Survey. Three species previously unknown for Ohio are reported as new state records: Macromia georgina (Selys), 1878, Gomphaeschna furcillata (Say), 1839, and Libellula deplanata Rambur, 1842. These records increase the number of known Odonata from Ohio to 156 species and subspecies. Also reported are 611 new county records, significantly expanding our knowledge of distribution of these species in Ohio. Comments on early or late flight dates and/or species status are made for several species. These records are based upon recent collecting and re-examination of museum collections.
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    Insects in the Killbuck Marsh Wildlife Area: 1993 Survey
    (1995-06) Williams, Roger N.; Ellis, M. S.; Fickle, D. S.
    The Killbuck Marsh Wildlife Area was the focus of a seven month survey performed in 1993 to determine the diversity of selected insects. Primary emphasis was focused on three families of Coleoptera: ground beetles, including tiger beetles (Carabidae); sap beetles (Nitidulidae); and carrion beetles (Silphidae). Rare or endangered species within these families were of particular interest and constant vigilance was made to detect them. Five collection methods were used at five sites within the Killbuck Marsh. These included: ultraviolet (black light) traps, flight interception (window) traps, bait traps, carrion bait sampling, and aerial and aquatic sweep netting. In all, 68 ground beetle, 30 sap beetle, and seven carrion beetle species were identified. In addition to these families, beetles from 47 other families (372 species) of Coleoptera were collected and identified. Aside from Coleoptera, several dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata), caddisflies (Trichoptera), butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera), and mosquitoes and midges (Diptera) were also taken. Six ground beetle species considered uncommon were encountered: Agonum cupripenne (Say), Agonum galvestonicum Casey, Chlaenius niger Randall, Oo'des americanum Dejean, Blemus discus (F.), and Stenocrepis cuprea (Chaudoir). One hister beetle (Histeridae), Anapleus marginatus LeConte, was also very uncommon for this area.
  • Item
    Front Matter
    (1995-06)